NYU Stern Logo
Academic Affairs
NYU Stern

As a Langone student, you must complete 28.5 credits of core courses that are known as the "Stern Core", plus an additional 4.5 credits of required electives called the "Langone Core". Langone Program students take the Stern Core and Langone Core classes during evenings or weekends. These Core courses may not be taken during the daytime as those sections are reserved exclusively for students in the Full-Time program.

The 28.5 credits of Stern Core is made up of the following 11 courses:

Basic Core:

COR1-GB.1302 (B01.1302) Leadership in Organization (formerly Managing Organizations) (3 credits)
COR1-GB.1303 (B01.1303) Firms & Markets (3 credits)
COR1-GB.1305 (B01.1305) Statistics & Data Analysis (3 credits)
COR1-GB.1306 (B01.1306) Financial Accounting & Reporting (3 credits)

 See if you are eligible to
establish proficiency in a Core course!
There are 3 ways to establish proficiency in Core courses - for more information, please visit our Policies & Procedures page - Establishing Proficiency in Core Courses.
Stern Core:
COR1-GB.2310 (B01.2310) Marketing (3 credits)
COR1-GB.2311 (B01.2311) Foundations of Finance (3 credits)
COR1-GB.2314 (B01.2314) Operations Management (formerly Competitive Advantage from Operations) (3 credits)
COR1-GB.2303 (B01.2303) The Global Economy (3 credits)
COR1-GB.2103 (B01.2103) Strategy I (1.5 credits)
COR1-GB.2104 (B01.2104) Strategy II (1.5 credits) (to be completed after completing Strategy I)
COR2-GB.3101 (B02.3101) Professional Responsibility (1.5 credits) (to be completed after all above COR1(B01) Core)


Core course Descriptions:

COR1-GB.1302 (B01.1302) Leadership in Organizations (formerly Managing Organizations) (3 credits)

The course is divided into two major components: organization theory and organization behavior. The first component is macro in nature and focuses on organizational-level problems such as how an organization should be designed (e.g., centralized or decentralized), what strategy it should follow (e.g., integrated or diversified), and how the conflict and politics endemic to organizational life can be managed. The second is primarily micro in nature and focuses on individual and group-level problems such as how to evaluate and reward employees, design jobs that motivate people, and supervise employees. Micro is concerned with individual and group effectiveness. Macro is concerned with overall organizational performance.

This course introduces some of the central topics in management theory, research, and practice -both micro and macro- as well as how they can be applied. It provides a basis for understanding and evaluating organizations and their managements. Such knowledge is equally relevant for those who aspire to positions outside as well as inside management. For example, in finance, investment bankers, financial analysts, lenders, and others require a sophisticated knowledge of organizations and their managements in order to make wise decisions within their respective responsibilities.

COR1-GB.1303 (B01.1303) Firms & Markets (3 credits)

This course provides insight into how markets work. The first part of the course starts with the study of decision making by consumers and firms and concludes with a fundamental result in economics: a set of conditions under which markets function efficiently. The second part of the course focuses on situations when, for one reason or another, markets don't work efficiently. The emphasis is on strategic behavior, as modeled by game theory.

COR1-GB.1305 (B01.1305) Statistics & Data Analysis (3 credits)

This course is designed to achieve an understanding of fundamental notions of data presentation and data analysis and to use statistical thinking in the context of business problems. The course deals with modern methods of data exploration (designed to reveal unusual or problematic aspects of databases), the uses and abuses of the basic techniques of inference, and the use of regression as a tool for management and for financial analysis.

COR1-GB.1306 (B01.1306) Financial Accounting & Reporting (3 credits)

Accounting reports are an important means of communication with investors. This course focuses on the development, analysis, and use of these reports. It provides an understanding of what these reports contain, what assumptions and concepts accountants use to prepare them, and why they use those assumptions and concepts. The course uses simple examples to provide students with a clear understanding of accounting concepts. It stresses the ability to apply these concepts to real world cases, which by their very nature are complex and ambiguous. In addition to text-oriented materials, the classes also include cases so that students can discuss the application of basic concepts, actual financial reports, and newspaper articles. In addition to traditional introductory topics, other topics may include mergers and acquisitions, purchase and pooling, free cash flow, and financial statement analysis.

COR1-GB.2310 (B01.2310) Marketing (3 credits)

This course provides an overall view of marketing in a customer-driven firm, focusing on essential marketing skills needed by successful managers in all business functions. Topics include how individual and organizational consumers make decisions, segmenting markets, estimating the economic value of customers to the firm, positioning the firm's offering, effective marketing research, new product development, pricing strategies, communicating with consumers, estimating advertising's effectiveness, and managing relationships with sales force and distribution partners. The course also studies how firms must coordinate these different elements of the marketing mix to insure that all marketing activities collectively forge a coherent strategy. The importance of combining qualitative and quantitative concepts in effective marketing analysis is also examined. The course uses a combination of lectures, class discussion, and case analysis. Marketing is a core course and assumes no prior knowledge of marketing. However, there are certain concepts from Firms & Markets that students should have mastered, including: price elasticity of demand, price discrimination, marginal cost, marginal revenue, efficient scale for production capacity, diminishing returns, utility functions and utility curves.

COR1-GB.2311 (B01.2311) Foundations of Finance (3 credits)

This is a quantitative course introducing the fundamental principles of asset valuation within the framework of modern portfolio theory. The key analytical concepts are present value, option value, risk/diversification and arbitrage. These tools are used to value stocks, bonds, options, and other derivatives, with applications to the structure of financial markets, portfolio selection, and risk management.

COR1-GB.2314 (B01.2314) Operations Management (formerly Competitive Advantage from Operations) (3 credits)

This course serves as an introduction to operations, viewed from the perspective of the general manager, rather than from that of the operations specialist. The coverage is very selective: the course concentrates on a small number of themes from the areas of operations management and information technology that have emerged as the central building blocks of world-class operations. It also presents a sample of key tools and techniques that have proven extremely useful. The topics covered are usually relevant to the manufacturing and service sectors.

COR1-GB.2303 (B01.2303) The Global Economy (3 credits)

We use the tools of international macroeconomics to explore the economic environment facing firms operating around the globe. Central issues include the role of economic policy and institutions in the performance of firms and nations; economic indicators and forecasting; employment and unemployment; interest rates, inflation, and monetary policy; global trade in goods and capital; foreign exchange rates; and emerging market crises. These issues are considered from the perspectives of both firms and countries. 

COR1-GB.2103 (B01.2103) Strategy I (1.5 credits)

This course provides students with the concepts and tools required to devise business strategies to gain competitive advantage at the product market level. It also shows how to apply the rules of competitive advantage to a range of economic markets in the United States and globally, where the business environment is increasingly turbulent. The course explains how to formulate a business strategy; how to analyze competitive markets; and how to define each firm's strategic situation. Focuses on how to create superior value for customers and capture enough value to create increasing profit for your firm. Students learn how successful firms develop superior resources (products, operations, human competencies, organizational teams, procurement, technology, finances, and business alliances) to gain and sustain competitive advantage in a dynamic economic environment.

COR1-GB.2104 (B01.2104) Strategy II (1.5 credits)

In this course, students learn how to develop skills needed to manage the multibusiness enterprise for the creation of corporate advantage. To create value through corporate strategy, managers must command a number of critical competencies. They must be able to create a vision that targets multiple-businesses' objectives, including achieving sustainable corporate growth in profits. This course requires integrating skills at developing and deploying corporate resources and capabilities; to apply analytical tools and perspectives to changing industries and multibusiness markets; and to design organizational structures, systems, and processes that achieve short-term and long-term corporate strength and profit growth. Students learn how to manage the interpersonal dynamics of strategy decision making and how to communicate effectively their visions and strategies to internal and external stakeholders of the corporation. A considerable part of corporate strategy today focuses on managing merger integration, alliances, internal growth, and global networks, which involves increasing "coopittion," or creating various combinations of both multiple business collaborations to expand new markets, and yet pursue simultaneous competitive goals to ensure the survival and growth of the firm. 

COR2-GB.3101 (B02.3101) Professional Responsibility (1.5 credits)

The purpose of this interdisciplinary course is twofold: First, it is designed to build the student's awareness of the interplay among a society's laws, ethical norms, and markets. Second, through case analyses, it provides the student with a chance to exercise his or her own ethical judgment in business situations. The overall goal is to help the student to realize that ethical assumptions, choices, and conflicts are inherent in virtually all business decisions, and to develop a greater understanding of the manager's professional responsibilities.