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Marketing in the News

Current Faculty Media Headlines

new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "For Mr. Galloway at N.Y.U., the slow pace of Amazon’s rollout of stores is a sign that it has not figured out physical retail yet, and that has surprised him. Five years ago, he believed Amazon would have hundreds of stores by this time. 'What appears to be clear is they haven’t yet zeroed in on a format they’re willing to massively scale,' he said. 'This is a company that the moment it figures out something that works, it puts nuclear energy behind it.'"

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "To the average person, this raw material is undetectable noise. But for organizations that know how to identify signals, there’s immense value in refining what has become an unlimited supply."

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Excerpt from TODAY.com -- "There will be certain high-end niches, but for the most part, and also it becomes a complicated conversation because there is an American manufacturing index - what car is the most manufactured car in the US? And the winner? The Toyota Camry. So what it means to be made in America is now taking on new meaning."

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "Used within reasonable limits, of course, these devices also offer us new graces. But we are not using them within reasonable limits. They are the masters; we are not. They are built to addict us, as the social psychologist Adam Alter’s new book 'Irresistible' points out — and to madden us, distract us, arouse us and deceive us."

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Excerpt from Business Insider -- "This overestimation is called the Dunning-Kruger effect. It is the cognitive bias that makes less competent people overestimate their own skills while underestimating the competence of others. The term was coined in 1999 in the publication of David Dunning and Justin Kruger. The psychologists had noticed in prior studies that in areas like reading comprehension, playing chess or driving a car, ignorance leads to confidence more often than knowledge does."

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Excerpt from Law360 -- "Earlier in the day, the petitioning investors called New York University professor Anindya Ghose to testify as an expert in online and mobile advertising. Ghose said that AOL had grown to become much more than an Internet service provider and had made in-roads into the digital marketplace. 'It was much more that a dial-up company,' Ghose said of AOL at the time of the Verizon deal. 'It was a global media tech company.'"

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Excerpt from AFP -- "Scott Galloway, who teaches brand strategy and digital marketing at New York University's Stern School of Business, said Uber has little room for further error after these missteps. Galloway, who also founded business intelligence firm L2, said the news about Uber over the past month has been 'very damaging' but may be surmountable."

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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "[Alter] concludes that not only are humans peculiarly susceptible to becoming hooked to their devices, even if they do not enjoy the experience, but games and social media companies are expert at keeping them enthralled."
 

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "The technology is designed to hook us that way. Email is bottomless. Social media platforms are endless. Twitter? The feed never really ends. You could sit there 24 hours a day and you’ll never get to the end. And so you come back for more and more."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "By the end of his enjoyable yet alarming book, 'Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked,' you may be convinced that Alter is right and want to seriously rethink the behavioral addictions in your life."

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Excerpt from Wharton@Work -- "'On the outside,' says Professor Anindya Ghose, 'it is very easy for businesses to get discouraged by consumers’ seeming resistance or inhibition to advertising. What lies beneath the surface is different though.' In his new book Tap: Unlocking the Mobile Economy, Ghose says the leveraging of mobile data, combined with his ground-breaking studies in randomized field experiments in different parts of the world, economics, and behavioral psychology, have unearthed knowledge that can help us better understand our customers, and ourselves."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "'The cool kid premium eventually goes away,' said Galloway, who is also cofounder of research firm L2. 'Instagram played that role two years ago. Facebook played that role four years ago. You can only be the new kid on the block for so long, and then it becomes ROI.'"

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Excerpt from WGSN -- "Social media has been instrumental in informing young consumers, and most importantly in instructing them on what is desirable and how luxury should look or feel."

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Excerpt from DMN -- "The fundamental principles are still very much there, it's just the tools have changed. If you think about communication and persuasion, the fundamentals are still the same. It's not like human beings have completely changed their nature and basic psychological motives. With respect to that, there's definitely an emphasis these days on digital."

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Excerpt from the Harvard Business Review -- "A classic finding in the psychology literature is the Dunning-Kruger effect (named after David Dunning and Justin Kruger, who first described it): Poor performers in a domain are more prone to overestimate their ability than good performers. Why? Poor performers are unaware of the many elements that go into expert performance, and thus they are overly confident in their ability to carry out all of the tasks necessary to succeed."

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Excerpt from The Telegraph -- "As Alter illustrates, a mere six ingredients lie behind most truly addictive experiences: goal setting, feedback, progress, escalation, cliffhangers, and social interaction. Think of the things you keep coming back to, for good or ill – running with your FitBit, watching Breaking Bad, browsing Facebook – and you’ll find one or more of these. Combine them all, as in a Massively Multiplayer Online Game like World of Warcraft, and to the right person at the right time they really can become irresistible."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'As the brand pushes forward, it is prudent to prepare the consumers for what is coming,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury, co-editor of Luxury: History Culture Consumption and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York."

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Excerpt from Crain's New York Business -- "'It’s episodic, nomadic,' said C. Samuel Craig, director of the entertainment, media and technology initiative at NYU’s Stern School of Business. 'You come together to make the film and then disappear and then reconfigure to make a different show or a TV commercial or a movie.'"

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Excerpt from TheStreet.com -- "'The average Indian consumer does not need as much as "localization" in high tech and high value assets as the average consumer elsewhere, such as in China. What that means is what works in the US will also, for the most part, work very well in India,' said Ghose."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Recognizing that low cost hardware manufacturing is not a way to sustain an economy when lower labor countries can undercut them in price, and recognizing the tremendous, broad spectrum engineering talent it has as a country, Taiwan is once again reinventing itself, focusing on intellectual property and innovation that are less capital intensive."

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Excerpt from The New York Post -- "'These stories, like this mother and daughter (from 84 Lumber), are ultimately hard to refute, hard to be critical of,' NYU marketing professor Minah Jung said. 'There was a collection of ads emphasizing liberty, equality, pro-immigration, diversity, uniting people from all backgrounds, openness to diversity.'"

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Excerpt from Marketing Dive -- "'A lot of people are watching the Super Bowl just for the commercials. So any influencer that comments on or ties their post back to the commercials could do particularly well,' said Barasch. '[P]eople are looking to engage with brands, products, and ads more on Super Bowl day than any other day of the year — so something that is geared towards consumer action (e.g., visiting a website, using a hashtag on social media, participating in a contest) could be particularly effective.'"

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Excerpt from the Los Angeles Times -- "'The country is so split politically right now,' said Russell S. Winer, a marketing professor at New York University. 'Marketers are spending at least $5 million just to be in the Super Bowl — and they don’t want their messages to alienate anyone.' ... 'Comedy is a good way to cut across the political spectrum,' Winer said."

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Excerpt from Inc. -- "The founder of the Future Today Institute, a strategy and technology research firm, Webb has been studying the future of technology and media for more than a decade. (Previously, she launched Webbmedia Group, a company that advised media and tech companies.) These days, she also lectures at Columbia University, and was recently designated an adjunct assistant professor at NYU's Stern School of Business. Insiders called Webb a key 'trend spotter' of the New York startup ecosystem. Webb is also a columnist for Inc. magazine."
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Excerpt from The Boston Globe -- "'There’s a reason why teams have fish and [birds] on their helmets and not people,' said Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at NYU’s Stern School of Business. 'It’s very dangerous for a team to associate itself with anyone but the most likable people in a public way. And politicians are almost always going to alienate at least half your base.'"

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Excerpt from the Los Angeles Times -- "'Trump's grandfather immigrated from Germany, so there's a double dose of irony,' said Russell S. Winer, a marketing professor at the New York University Leonard N. Stern School of Business. 'I think Americans will like the ad, as they don't think of immigrants from Europe the same way as immigrants from Africa or Muslim countries in the Middle East.'"

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Opening up its bespoke services to everyday clients will help Calvin Klein elevate the customer’s perception of the brand and also intrigue them with the possibility of something both unique and special (as all bespoke items are) as well as representative of the iconic American style the brand ushered in the past with its collections,' [Serdari] said."

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "Coined in 1999 by then-Cornell psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, the eponymous Dunning-Kruger Effect is a cognitive bias whereby people who are incompetent at something are unable to recognize their own incompetence. And not only do they fail to recognize their incompetence, they’re also likely to feel confident that they actually are competent."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "'If you’re vested in growth, you have to be vested in innovation,' noted Luke Williams, a professor of innovation at the NYU Stern School of Business, who spoke Tuesday at Oracle CloudWorld. The challenge for companies is that existing organizations are 'systems of continuity' that tend to resist real change unless they’re under an almost existential threat."

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Excerpt from The Karen Hunter Show -- "When you search on Google for something, sneakers, let's say, and you click on the images tab, it will bring up a whole bunch of sneakers. Someone in the past had to tag that image with it. Now, computers are tagging it automatically."

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Excerpt from MarketWatch -- "Regardless of the tense political climate, presidential inaugurations aren’t typically seen as a shopping opportunity, said Priya Raghubir, the chairwoman of New York University’s Stern Business School’s marketing department. That said, since retailers are experiencing a post-holiday slump, some will likely try to capitalize and sell inauguration memorabilia, she added."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "If you are in any position of leadership—whether you’re the CEO, a mid-level manager, an investor, or an entrepreneur with a great idea—you will be confronted by new technology for the rest of your life. Failing to strategically monitor these trends and plan for the future will put your organization and future earnings at risk. People and organizations who use the tools of futurists —Nintendo, IBM, Amazon —succeeded even in the face of disruption; while those that didn’t—Blackberry, Zenith, Kodak––met their demise."

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Excerpt from Scientific American -- "Although psychologists have known for a long time that people associate dark skin with negative personality traits, this research shows that the reverse is also true: when we hear about an evil act, we are more likely to believe it was done by someone with darker skin. This 'bad is black' effect may have its roots in our deep-seated human tendency to associate darkness with wickedness. Across time and cultures, we tend to portray villains as more likely to be active during nighttime and to don black clothing. Similarly, our heroes are often associated with daytime and lighter colors. These mental associations between color and morality may negatively bias us against people with darker skin tones. If this is true, it has far-reaching implications for our justice system. For example, eyewitnesses to crimes may be more likely to falsely identify suspects who possess darker skin."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "'They might be able to take Prime households from $1,300 per year to $10,000 by basically saying we’re going to fulfill everything you need,' said Galloway in a recent YouTube interview with L2 co-founder Maureen Mullen."

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Excerpt from Sourcing Journal -- "Fashion brands can combat consumer fatigue and turn it into excitement. To do that though, they need to better utilize creativity as a means to solving consumer-centered problems that are extracted from contemporary culture. For some brands, this needs to be addressed at the business level to bridge the gap between their operations and creative teams. For others, it needs to be executed properly and manifest itself in new form in front of the consumer. It can take the form of consumer-centered packaging/grouping, communicated in a context that stays as close to reality as possible, and activated via signs and codes that are authentic and flexible. If beauty can do this, so can fashion."

financial times logo feature
 
Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "A couple of days ago, I also received a book called Irresistible: The rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping us hooked by Adam Alter and I’m looking forward to diving into that."

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Excerpt from Knowledge@Wharton -- "A focus of my book is about these nine forces that are shaping the mobile economy. I start by talking about context, which is sort of the super-force, as in why your customer is here, what he or she wants, and how he or she is feeling. But there are also other factors like location and time, weather and crowdedness, as I mentioned. For a retailer that’s trying to … reach out to the consumer, what they need to do is essentially figure out this concept of 'in-the-moment marketing.' The better you know the consumer’s context, their 'why, what and how,” and the better you know some of the other forces, the better you can combine that data. The sum of the parts is greater than the whole."

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Excerpt from Quartz -- "'Uber wants to essentially use its API so other app developers can build their apps on top of it,' Anindya Ghose, director of New York University’s Center for Business Analytics, told Quartz. 'I see it as Uber’s attempt to broaden and diversify its presence.'"

new york magazine
Excerpt from New York Magazine -- "Dunning, a social psychologist, is one of the lead authors of 'Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties In Recognizing One’s Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments,' an article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology based on the results of a study he and a student, Justin Kruger, conducted at Cornell in 1999. As the title suggests, what they found was the existence of a cognitive bias in which the less able people are, the more likely they are to overestimate their abilities."

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Excerpt from Poets & Quants -- "Stern has a couple of different retail courses, a specific luxury marketing class as well, and a speaker series which Carr runs. 'At NYU Stern, we have a really strong understanding of our unique geographic advantage. New York is the fashion capital of the world. Anyone who’s anyone is here, whether they’re an American company or an Asian company. If you don’t have a presence here, you won’t make it globally,' Carr says. 'So given that everyone is here, we have a great opportunity to bring in speakers.' ... Li has taken several electives in the luxury marketing track already, including the experiential seminar, and believes that they’ve prepared her well for her internships. 'It really gave me a good sense of luxury retail operations, how the different functions play together to form the company and how the company would run on a day-to-day basis,' she says."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Medium's not in that league by any means, and it'll be an uphill battle for them to be able to incentivize people to pay for their content."

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Excerpt from The Native Society -- "There are endless ways to contribute to the world, and the world needs many sorts of talents. All I can do is try to find my own way to contribute. At this point, the one thing I’m sure of is that I draw strength from the people around me. I’m honored to be part of a discipline full of such dedicated and talented people. So I do my best to bring people together and make a whole greater than the sum of its parts. Part of that is being there when I’m called on in unexpected ways, being open to new things, and being willing to leave my comfort zone. I try to take a 'never say no' approach to work and life."

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Excerpt from Poets & Quants -- "Williams’ philosophies are grounded in a successful career that includes designing over 100 products and holding 30 patents. Like any great teacher, Williams is simply looking to unlock and magnify the potential talents of his pupils. 'When students start believing that their fundamental purpose is to alter the status quo, rather than preserve it, their motivation and mindset starts to change,' he observes. 'They begin to see opportunities beyond what others have defined as limits.'"

financial times logo feature
 
Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "Limiting work used to be simple: it was just a matter of imposing shorter shifts. The seamless, addictive nature of digital communication makes it harder. But companies have a stake in realising 'how damaging social media and tech addiction can be', as Adam Alter, author of Irresistible, a forthcoming book on digital addiction, argues."

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Excerpt from WalletHub -- "The question, therefore, is not only whether the diamond prices will continue to drop based on factors that determine the global economy, but also whether diamonds can still capture the imagination of consumers and whether these consumers are willing to pay premium prices for diamond jewelry."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Grand Street Dental exemplifies a thorough and classic approach to marketing, design, and innovation, normally utilized by large companies. What I found so extraordinary and more importantly, what patients will be impressed with and want to spread virally, is the unusual level of patient experience empathy at every point that a brand impression can be made."
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Excerpt from Cosmopolitan -- "You're less likely to break a big bill, a study in the Journal of Consumer Research found."

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Excerpt from Quartz -- "Ghose recommends that Apple should 'partner with some of the local app developers so that the content and features are customized to the Indian market' and take a page out of Amazon’s playbook to license deals with major movie and music studios for digital content."

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Excerpt from Scientific American -- "Psychologists have known for some time, thanks to work led by Nira Liberman from Tel Aviv University and Yaacov Trope from New York University, that goals look different in the distant versus near future. Three months ago, when you booked your holiday travel, you probably had some abstract notions of 'family togetherness,' 'relaxation,' or 'adventure.' The night before you left, however, you probably had some more immediate concerns in mind. Concerns like, 'How is all this stuff going to fit in the suitcase?' and 'Will I be able to get an Uber driver at 4:45 AM?'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think the most likely one is they extract their pound of flesh and they reduce the price. The other option is to walk from the deal. I think the stock would pop and it would show some discipline on behalf of Verizon management if they walked right now. The other thing is to try and create some sort of legal entity where they would put AOL and Yahoo into that distinct entity to try and, if you will, create a firewall around what might be an unbelievable amount of liability."

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Excerpt from Politico -- "Companies like IBM, Procter & Gamble and Google have relied on futurists to look at the fringe, map trends and build scenarios for the next 10, 20, 30 and even 50 years of their organizations and industries. Because of futures thinking, IBM — a company that was founded before there were cars, let alone computers — is at the forefront of artificial intelligence, modeling the ways in which our work will be augmented by machines."

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Excerpt from Consumer Reports -- "'There’s just something painful about taking money out of your wallet,' says Priya Raghubir, professor of marketing at New York University. When you hand over cash or a check, you part with something of value. Yet after you swipe a credit or debit card, you put the same object back in your wallet. Paying feels less real, which encourages more spending."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Multi-disciplinary designer teams, solve problems and find solutions often in collaboration with insightful individuals from outside the firm. Snøhetta’s staff includes architects, interior architects, landscape architects, and graphic designers, that work collaboratively. At times other perspectives are brought in, such as anthropologists, subject specialists and individuals working in different forms of the arts."

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Excerpt from TheStreet.com -- "'Amazon does pose a major threat,' said Anindya Ghose, Professor of Marketing at New York University's Leonard N. Stern School of Business. 'It is incredibly difficult for a firm like Flipkart or Snapdeal to find a sustainable unique selling point in e-commerce retailing that will help differentiate them from the 800 pound gorilla in the room.'"

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Excerpt from NBC News -- "'Conversion rates, which used to be a bottleneck in the past, are no longer as much of an impediment,' [Ghose] said. This is for two reasons: Shoppers today are more comfortable shopping on their phones, and stores have invested in technology, like credit card image-capturing, that makes transactions more seamless."

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Excerpt from Evolllution -- "I am a strong believer in marketing and brand building. I think that many of the concepts that I teach in my core marketing course can be applied to the management of higher education institutions. Other than brand building, all organizations need a strong marketing strategy and what we call a value proposition: why a student would come to, say, NYU rather than another university. Other key marketing principles are distribution and communications. For example, with respect to distribution, many universities are not adding online educational offerings beyond traditional bricks and mortar."

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Excerpt from The Guardian -- "Dishonesty hurts a brand’s reputation as well as sales, said Tülin Erdem, a business and marketing professor who specializes in brand reputation management at New York University’s Stern School of Business. Welspun’s shares dropped by nearly 43% in the week following the announcement from Target, which was the manufacturer’s second largest customer and accounted for $90m, or 10% of the company’s business, in the fiscal year that ended in March. Retailers play a part in ensuring consumers get what they’re paying for. Although it can be difficult to track every manufacturer’s claim, retailers have a responsibility to take action promptly when they suspect dishonesty, said Erdem."

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Excerpt from WalletHub -- "I would strongly encourage consumers to read the 'fine print' on these deals. Some will say the deal is only good for the specific model (stock keeping unit or SKU), and the deal is only good for existing stock. Some may say you can get a "rain check" for when they come back in stock."

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Excerpt from Knowledge@Wharton -- "Mobile marketing is a powerful approach. Other forms of advertising... can't really come close to matching. But the reality is, in the digital world, a lot of folks find advertising on mobile devices annoying or intrusive and they strongly dislike these ads that ruin their browsing or consumption experience. But the reason this happens is twofold. One is: brands don't have enough information about consumer preferences, so they're showing them a bunch of ads, like throwing darts in the air, hoping one will stick. But in return, what happens is people get overwhelmed and annoyed by those offers and they tune out. So the solution here is figuring out an optimal balance where the number of offers should be less frequent than what it is right now and should be more relevant and targeted. And that's where I ... talk about this two-way communication between consumers and brands. If consumers are able to share more information about themselves, then brands are going to be able to use mobile as a concierge and as a butler, but not as a stalker."

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Excerpt from MIT Technology Review -- "'Pure-play Web retailing is not sustainable,' New York University marketing professor Scott Galloway told me. He points out that the deep discounting and high delivery costs that characterize Web sales have made it hard for Amazon to turn a profit. If Amazon were to remain an online-only merchant, he says, its future success would be in jeopardy. He believes the company will end up opening 'hundreds and then thousands of stores.'"

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'He’s built this enormously resonant brand with what I’ll affectionately call angry white males. It’s not only a big market, but it appears to be growing,' said Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing who teaches brand strategy at New York University, on Tuesday. 'But his current product offering caters to affluent, fortunate and relatively happy people. And as a general rule, the affluent are mildly horrified by the current trajectory of the Trump brand.'"

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Excerpt from WIRED -- "New York University management professor Anindya Ghose suggests that the best way forward might be for a large company to acquire Twitter and then sell shares to a new co-op, creating a sort of hybrid model."

NYU Stern/CBS Media Analytics Initiative Conference feature
 
NYU Stern's marketing department hosted a conference as part of the NYU Stern/CBS Media Analytics Initiative.

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Excerpt from OZY -- "Simply because someone started a successful company in a certain industry does not mean that they can replicate that, or that they can identify it in somebody else.'"

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Excerpt from The San Francisco Chronicle -- "'It does have a very powerful niche, and it’s a distinct player in that niche,' said Anindya Ghose, a professor of information technology and marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'Live (video) is a potential game changer that actually put Twitter ahead of the curve. ... TV is finally everywhere, and this plays into that larger ecosystem and gives them some good numbers to bank on.'"

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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "'If Vine was housed inside a company that was growing at 30% a year…it would have survived,' said Scott Galloway, founder of consumer-brand research firm L2 Inc. and a marketing professor at New York University. For Twitter, 'not growing its user base, a part-time CEO and disgruntled investors—all of that adds up to forced focus.'"

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Excerpt from Entrepreneur -- "'What successful companies—for example, Amazon—do is to constantly search for something better for customers,' says Jeffrey A. Carr, a professor of marketing and entrepreneurship at New York University’s Stern School of Business."

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Excerpt from MEL -- "...Raghubir doesn’t think checks will ever go entirely extinct. While it’s technically feasible to make all payments electronically and in cash, she says, some people will cling to checks out of pure habit, tradition or ease. Besides, she adds, 'I could not personally imagine going and giving a wedding gift to a friend of mine through a Venmo transfer. I would also feel embarrassed putting cash into an envelope. To me it would be odd.'"

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Excerpt from the Associated Press -- "'In the short run, business gets damaged, but in the long run there's a lot of opportunity with less aspirational brands that target the middle- and lower-class,' NYU's Galloway said. 'I think the Trump brand effectively dies in a Manhattan, but it thrives in some of the lower income, very red regions.'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "This feels like a 'bet the ranch' strategy. If Yahoo doesn't work out, it's a rounding error for Verizon and people forget about it. AT&T really is: 'We're betting on content. We're going for something that's very aggressive that has a decent chance of regulator pushback.' This is a game-changing transaction."

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Excerpt from MarketWatch -- "Millennials are a 'non linear' generation, says Galloway. 'They want what they want, when they want it. Especially media,' he says. 'They want to consume media on their own terms.' They hate the idea of letting networks or cable companies decide when a movie or sitcom is available. The investment play here? 'Netflix is the brand that embodies this trend,' says Galloway."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think of this sort of as the Millennial merger. That is, what do Millennials want? They want content that is so outstanding that it doesn't need to be supported by advertising that they can consume it in a nonlinear fashion. And the distribution is simple: It's on a mobile device. And this merger would bring those two together. I actually like this a lot. I think these two companies together would be a juggernaut."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Samuel Craig, director of NYU Stern’s Entertainment, Media and Technology program said online content producers have a big leg up when it comes to building and keeping audiences. 'Netflix’s advantage and Amazon’s advantage is that they’ve got lots of consumer data that give them insight into what people want to see,' he said."

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Excerpt from CKGSB Knowledge -- "One of the things we found is that mobile coupons actually have the highest redemptions from the highest income group. ... This is very interesting because mobile marketing has often received some flak that it's not very profitable because it only attracts the lower income customers, but what we are seeing is that the highest income customers have the highest redemption probability."

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Excerpt from ABC News -- "Ghose said that to restore trust with consumers, the company would have to recall all of the defective phones (a process it has started), pinpoint the cause of the problem, fully reimburse consumers and convince its business partners 'to give it another shot with the next set of product releases.'"

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "Scott Galloway, a professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business, said Mayer probably relied on her legal counsel to vet the document rather than reviewing it herself. 'However, CEOs are ultimately accountable for what’s in the proxy,' he said, 'if it comes out that their lack of transparency was a function of them not wanting to hamstring the Verizon deal, then they've held material information back from an acquirer.'"

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Excerpt from The Chronicle of Philanthropy -- "Fundraisers often suggest gift amounts to help guide donor decision-making. A new study on this practice, known as anchoring, suggests that low anchors may drag down giving more than high ones bring it up. Charities must find a balance when suggesting donation amounts, says Minah Jung, an assistant professor of marketing at New York University and an author of the study."

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Excerpt from WIRED -- "'It is well known that Android can be much better optimized than what it is today,' says Ghose. 'By controlling the hardware, Google can dramatically improve the reliability and consistency of the user experience on Android phones.'"

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'Amazon is the accidental winner here,' said Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at the Stern School of Business at New York University. 'Amazon got there first, which is superimpressive, and it has been a huge hit.'"

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Excerpt from MEL -- "'Awareness is going to be positive [for businesses], but there could be other unintended consequences,' [Barasch] says. 'I just suggest that they also think about the downsides that come when you know you’re at the top of the ski slope and you’re thinking about how to get that photo.'"

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Excerpt from AFP -- "Although the public has become habituated to news about data breaches, this news may erode confidence in the online ecosystem, according to Galloway. 'The hacks are more damaging to the ecosystem than individual companies,' he said. 'Ms. Mayer's obscene compensation and the hack give people the sense the game is rigged and that they can trust no platform.'"

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Excerpt from Poets & Quants -- "'I’m just surrounded by energy and students who are excited about being at NYU,' says Barasch, who will teach a core Introduction to Marketing course to undergrads in the spring. 'But the real draw was Stern’s Marketing Department. It’s top-notch. It has some of the best researchers, the most published and well-known names.'"

new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'You can be a pioneer in the market and get surpassed by other things,' Professor Greenwald said. 'I think that’s partly what’s happening to them — their food safety problems coincided with all these new concepts like Cava Grill and Sweetgreen.'"

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Excerpt from Livemint -- "The problem with loyalty programmes is that there are too many of them, they are undifferentiated (i.e. the benefits are similar so they don’t offer unique benefits), and difficult for consumers to use with some exceptions like airlines and hotels. The best way for companies to build loyalty is not through gimmicks but by investing in their brands by constantly innovating and offering clear value propositions to their target audiences."

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Excerpt from The Atlantic -- "'Consumers are jaded about advertising in a way they weren’t several decades ago,' says Adam Alter, an associate professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business, via email. 'It is harder to appeal to them than it used to be, and they tend to see through overt marketing pitches.' That has in turn led to a new arsenal of branding tactics. 'Companies have had to learn subtlety,' Alter says."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "The release of a seemingly lackluster version could also end up benefitting Apple in at least one way, according to Anindya Ghose, a professor of information technology at NYU’s Stern School of Business. 'It’s a very smart experiment by Apple to test the true extent of their loyal base,' Ghose said. 'Sometimes, in the long scheme of things, these price experimentations are a great way for a company — even as brilliant as Apple — to be able to infer market appetite for future renditions of the same product.'"

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Excerpt from Universities.com -- "[Our] location within New York City and our Global Network are truly the two factors that differentiate our program from that of other schools. New York City [is] a hub for marketing and advertising, and as such there is ample opportunity for students to find internships or careers."

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Excerpt from Mic -- "'Addiction always reflects an underlying psychological need that isn't met,' New York University's Adam Alter, author of the forthcoming book Irresistible: the Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked, told me in an email. 'For some people, that need is social validation; for others it's confirmation that they're attractive; and for others still it might be a sense of mastery over the environment when they feel helpless or powerless.'"

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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "Dunning and Kruger set tests of grammar, logic and even having a sense of humour to a group of undergraduates. Then they asked them how they stacked up to others in the group. Was their grasp of logic and grammar better or worse than average? Were they better able than other students to distinguish funny from unfunny jokes?"

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Excerpt from The Detroit News -- "'Amazon is the great white shark of retail and its appetite is not that discerning — it will eat anything,' said Scott Galloway, professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'I think they’ll go after every large consumer category. It’s not if, it’s when.'"

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Considering that British brands have been doing well in the United States, a trend that has grown stronger in the last five years and perhaps will counteract the consequences of Brexit, it is no accident that Victoria Beckham enjoys a positive brand equity in the American market,' [Serdari] said. 'With playful Instavideos being released through Victoria Beckham's Instafeed almost a month before her collection hits the stores the celebrity designer can certainly drive interest in her new, stylishly packaged beauty collection.'"

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Excerpt from Yahoo News -- "Adam L. Alter and Hal E. Hershfield from New York University and UCLA, respectively, found across six studies that at the end of a decade, people become more preoccupied with aging and worries about life’s meaningfulness. The researchers said that such thoughts lead to behaviors that 'suggest a search for, or a crisis of meaning.'"

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Excerpt from Reuters -- "You can still make money in exhibition, and the way to do it is to enhance the experience. More luxurious seating and food and alcohol all enhance the experience and also attract a difference audience."

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Excerpt from Fortune -- "Large companies often pay tens of millions of dollars simply to show the Olympic rings insignia on their particular products in the run-up to the games and after, says Alvin Lieberman, clinical professor of marketing entrepreneurship and innovation at New York University’s Stern School of Business. ... Crowdfunding can be a good alternative to running up expenses they can’t pay for. 'It is a very good place for athletes to go and for people to connect,' Lieberman says."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "'Facebook is very worried about Snapchat,' said NYU marketing professor Scott Galloway. 'Facebook is used to owning social media, and not being the hottest girl on campus has them a little freaked out.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Both Reggie Award winning examples illustrate how insightful, strategic and innovative activations, that are original and very different from anything ever done before, can massively impact awareness, willingness to try, brand perceptions, and earn extensive target audience amplification: all by capturing imaginations, creating a sense of awe and evoking positive emotions. Both also highlight the benefits of thoughtful, strategic partnerships to cost effectively amplify what brands can achieve on their own."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Anindya Ghose, a business professor at the NYU Stern School, has been following Apple in China and in India, where Apple's sales growth was strong this quarter. 'I’m very optimistic and bullish about Apple’s future proliferation in India,' Ghose said."

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Excerpt from The New York Post -- "'What they really could do with is a campaign that clearly articulates Twitter’s unique selling point' versus rivals like Facebook, says Anindya Ghose, a professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business."
 

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "This is over. They'll give her peace with honor. Let her leave gracefully. But this is a series of botched acquisitions, severance payments to employees who were there for 14 months in excess of $100 million. A decrease in EBITDA of 50%, a decrease in revenues of 20%, and in exchange she's walking out the door with a quarter of a billion dollars. I think this kind of thing is the reason why people lose faith in corporations. So best of luck to her. But this is the end of her reign, I believe, at Yahoo."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'It became a cash cow for them and generated lots and lots of revenue,' said C. Samuel Craig, director of the entertainment, media and technology program at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'And then it slowly began to disappear, and it was supplanted by the DVD.'"

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Gucci has moved from a fashion to a lifestyle brand,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury, co-editor of Luxury: History Culture Consumption and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York. 'The new line of jewelry and watches is featured in this new campaign individually as precious accents that dot the backdrop of the Gucci world.'"

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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "'Some people have been surprised at what Jeff has been able to accomplish at a difficult time for CNN,' says Al Lieberman, a professor who worked for Mr Murdoch in the early 1990s. 'Don’t be surprised if Murdoch turns around and talks to a guy like Zucker.'"

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Excerpt from Financial Times -- "'[Rupert] doesn’t deviate much … the stance is we’re winning and it’s not broken, so don’t fix it,' said Al Lieberman, a professor at New York University who worked for Rupert Murdoch from 1985 through 1993."

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Excerpt from Fast Company -- "In one experiment led by psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, participants were asked to rate their abilities and offered a monetary reward if they were able to assess themselves accurately. In spite of that motivator, though, people still overestimated their skill level considerably. Try as we might, it appears many of us assume we're more competent than we are simply because we aren't aware of what we don't know. Even unintentionally, our own ignorance compounds."

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Excerpt from US News & World Report -- "The excitement around Tesla, its brand, and its enigmatic, Tony Stark-like leader create more than just intangibles and billionaires talking their book, says Scott Galloway, founder and chairman at L2 Inc., a leading intelligence firm that benchmarks overall brand performance. 'You could argue that Tesla has access to the cheapest capital in the history of the automobile industry … it makes sense from a capital allocation standpoint' to take on expensive endeavors like the gigafactory. Galloway points to Tesla's price-sales ratio, which is 7.8, and notes that General Motors Co.'s (GM) P/S is a mere 0.3, making secondary offerings a less attractive way to raise money."

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Excerpt from mbaMission -- "As one first year we interviewed said of his experience at Stern, 'So far, the most impressive class has been "Marketing" with Jeff Carr,' adding, 'He's super engaging and makes you think more about the consequences of your actions in marketing than simply teaching you the tools. The class structure is very informal, but all of the students are learning a ton.'"

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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "Others caution the world of entertainment has changed dramatically, threatening the perceived safety of movie attendance. With the advent of digital streaming sites such as YouTube and Netflix, 'there are simply more options for people these days', said Sam Craig, a professor at NYU Stern."

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Excerpt from Radiate with Betty Liu -- "The bottom line is, the key to being an entrepreneur is you are more risk aggressive than anybody else. You are willing to sign the front of a check to go to work, not the back."

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Excerpt from Fortune -- "Williams says that while the key things all entrepreneurs need are mentorship and access to financing, both of which 10,000 Small Businesses provides, he adds that if entrepreneurship programs really want to create job growth, they need to focus on helping so-called disruptive, young businesses that tend to add jobs more quickly. The Goldman program, he says, focuses more on creating incremental growth. The median age of its business is 12 years old, which puts them a good distance away from startup territory."

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Excerpt from Quartz -- "'I don’t believe the Indian market will be able to sustain two big domestic players and one big international player,' said Anindya Ghose, director of New York University’s Center for Business Analytics. 'In about three years, I believe, the Indian market will have to consolidate into one international and one domestic player. So it will be Amazon, and either Flipkart or Snapdeal.'"

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Excerpt from Business Insider -- "In this case, according to Galloway, Tesla did three things right:

It acknowledged the problem in a blog post on its website Thursday.
Had the top guy address the matter head-on.
And it overcorrected; reiterating Autopilot's limitations, and reminding drivers to stay alert, even with the feature activated."

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Excerpt from the Los Angeles Times -- "'Unless statistics show this is not only as dangerous but more dangerous than traditional modes of driving, I don’t think you’re going to see a slowdown' in using the technology, [Galloway] said."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'John Lobb is a brand whose DNA relies on the one-on-one relationship between the craftsman and the customer,' Ms. Serdari said. 'It is the tacit knowledge John Lobb’s craftsmen have about the brand’s customers from doing bespoke order after bespoke order that gives them that extra confidence in manipulating the materials.'"

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Excerpt from Shanghai Daily -- "'Firms need to have very active customer service, and departments need to be very engaged with social media,' Morwitz argued."
 

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Excerpt from the Harvard Business Review -- "On average, those who underrated their skills were above average in their overall coaching effectiveness (reaching the 57th percentile). Those who had overrated themselves, however, were significantly below average, reaching only the 32nd percentile. ... incompetent people fail to recognize their own deficiencies and don’t recognize the skill in others. The lower an individual is on any scale of measurement, the more out-of-touch they tend to become."

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Excerpt from Yahoo Finance -- "'Owning a hotel is a terrible business,' says Scott Galloway, a marketing professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'Licensing your name and taking a portion of the proceeds is a great business.' ... 'What really jumps out at me is how asymmetric the [Trump Tower Tampa] contract is,” says Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, director of the Center for Real Estate Finance Research at the Stern School. 'Trump has very little contractual obligation and a lot of rights.'"

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Excerpt from Strategy + Business -- "...when people believe others are better off, they want things they think those other people don’t have. However, when the items are less available because their peers already have them, it diminishes the ability for these items to offset the relative imbalance in resources, and the effect goes away."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'There's a big social element to it,' said Sam Craig, a professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business. 'You want to see it, because you've got friends that watch it, and you want to be able to talk about it. You want to be in the know.'"

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Excerpt from CNBC -- "As Professor Scott Galloway of NYU says, 'Advertising is increasingly a tax that poor people or the technologically unsophisticated pay,'..."
 

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Excerpt from Broadcasting & Cable -- "'We are glad to partner with CBS on this exciting research initiative,' Assael said in a statement. 'As cross-platform exposure to television shows has increased, "watching TV" has taken on a whole new meaning that has important implications for the media industry and our society that are worthy of serious research.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Virtual reality is one of the latest technologies marketers are trying to wrap their heads around to figure out how to best utilize the tool to achieve brand objectives. While we’re only at the tip of the iceberg in terms of impactful ways to use VR for marketing, several pioneers have found creative ways to do it well and support their unique value propositions."

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Excerpt from Yahoo Tech -- "Watching moments unfold through a viewfinder may seem like a narrow, distracted point of view, but a new study suggests otherwise. People who take photos of their experiences actually enjoy them more, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Russell Winer a professor of marketing at NYU’s Stern School of Business, said diners like to feel like they’re in charge, and taking the tip out of their hands — literally — may not make them feel at ease. 'People like the discretion,' he said. 'They like the separation of the tip from the meal because it gives them the opportunity to reward excellent service and penalize terrible service.'"

christian science monitor
Excerpt from Christian Science Monitor -- "'Australia has been using the same brown packaging for some time, and a review of two dozen studies showed that it deters smoking – and also seems to make the cigarettes taste worse, which was an unexpected side-effect of the repackaging,' Prof. Alter writes. 'A cigarette that comes from an ugly brown box will, similarly, seem less appealing for the same reason. We associate that brown color with so many negative substances and ideas that the cigarette comes to take on those negative associations as well. I certainly think it should be tried in America.'"

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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "NYU’s Prof Raghubir says there are good reasons to cut brand spend when the going gets tough: 'You probably don’t want to be investing too heavily at a time when a greater mention of your brand is only going to backfire and remind people that you exist, when you’re trying to just weather a crisis.'"
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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "'Brands shouldn’t change their name for the sake of being hip,' said Tülin Erdem, a marketing professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business. She said 'it seems like [Tribune] is acting very quickly without strategic focus to change the name.'"
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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "'Brands need to create a story that feels authentic to a consumer who has been overexposed to traditional advertising messages,' [Serdari] says."
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Excerpt from The Atlantic -- "Galileo versus the Church, for fueling the myth that science and religion are natural enemies. But the universe doesn’t become less spiritual as we understand it better; in fact, the poetry in scientific truths flourishes with deeper understanding."
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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "Jacob Jacoby, a marketing professor at New York University, said Coke could face a high bar if it challenges beverage companies’ use of 'zero' in court after not demonstrating consumer confusion in the case of Diet Rite Pure Zero."
May 25, 2016
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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'If Goldman is a giant face-sucking squid then Google and Facebook are Predator and Alien,' said Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at NYU’s Stern School of Business. Both Silicon Valley and Wall Street are made up of powerful companies focused on shareholders. So both should fall under the same scrutiny, said Galloway."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "To increase casual interactions, everyone enters on the 12th floor. The first impression to hit you is the positive and productive energy—people seem genuinely happy. At the center of the top floor is a café and cafeteria, in some ways the heart of the office, with tables scattered around for drinking, eating, and impromptu meetings. Thirty screens mounted high around the center perimeter feature photos of the talent teams that work on each account, rotating along with client names and creative work highlights."

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Excerpt from Business 2 Community -- "There’s a phenomenon known as the illusion of explanatory depth, and the idea is that there are certain things that we assume we understand much better than we do. If you ask someone how well can they can explain how a bicycle works on a scale of one to ten, people will between an eight and a ten out of ten."

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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "'This is a bold move. It’s a bit like if Apple changed its name to "innovation", because one of the core associations of (Budweiser) is already America,' said Scott Galloway, a professor at New York University. 'It could be a stroke of genius, but I think it’s a risky change … to what is arguably one of the world’s greatest brands.'"

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Excerpt from Quartz -- "'Startup devaluations…can be a blessing in disguise, in the sense that it makes the company leadership take a close hard look at the current monetisation model, re-evaluate any fragilities and make strategic and tactical adjustments accordingly,' Anindya Ghose, director of New York University’s Center for Business Analytics said."

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Excerpt from CNBC -- "'In my academic research and industry consulting, I have seen tremendous benefits accruing to firms, organizations and consumers alike from the use of data-driven decision-making, data science, and business analytics,' Anindya Ghose, the director of Center for Business Analytics at New York University's Stern School of Business, said."

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Excerpt from Seeking Alpha -- "In a study done by Masakazu Ishihara from New York University, it was found that as the price of new games increased, the average profits per game would fall by 10% while if title prices decreased, the average profits per game actually increased by 19%."

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Excerpt from Fashionista -- "'These are difficult, complicated and costly logistics businesses,' says Lawrence Lenihan, cofounder and co-CEO of fashion-focused venture operating firm Resonance Companies. 'Their customers love them for convenience and selection, but I'm not sure that there is a profitable sustainable business at the end of the journey. They seem to be trying to emphasize the high end of the market with watches and jewelry because the margins are the highest and the logistics cost per contribution margin are the lowest. But then they are [facing] a whole host of competition, including the brands themselves who have the credibility of physical presence along with new products.'"

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Excerpt from Racked -- "'Luxury brands cannot "cheapen" their brands by frequent discounts and price promotions,' says NYU professor of business and marketing Tülin Erdem. 'It is inconsistent with their brand identity since if they do so their brand equity will be diluted. Most luxury brands have a sense of exclusivity and reflect a unique style, [and] too many people using these [discounts] will damage exclusivity and uniqueness.'"

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Excerpt from Consumer Reports -- "For such illegal sales to stop, the regulations that govern sale prices will have to be improved—a slow process since pricing is regulated at the state level. Meanwhile, though, all the bad publicity and penalties could cause merchants to tone down their marketing tactics, says Vicki G. Morwitz, a marketing professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business."

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Excerpt from Quartz -- "Given India’s price-sensitive buyers, there are high chances of online retailers losing customers once discounts are discontinued. 'If they do not offer deep discounts, Indian consumers will switch back to offline retailers, which seem to be always on sale,' Ghose of New York University said. 'I do not think this cultural behavior of the average Indian consumer will change even with a substantial increase in the average disposable income in India.'"

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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "One challenge is to break down your expenses according to whether they are ordinary and recurring or exceptional and unusual, says Mr. Alter. 'What you’ll start to notice is that so-called exceptional expenses account for a large chunk of your budget,' and need to be acknowledged as recurring spending, he says."

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Excerpt from CrowdFund Beat -- "'In the future, donors will be a lot more circumspect and skeptical about putting in money, especially in projects where they could have even an inkling of an idea that this might be bought out by a tech giant like Google, Facebook, or Apple,' says Anindya Ghose, a professor at New York University who studies the crowdfunding sector. 'They do not believe in backing projects for financial, commercial reasons. For them it’s a lot about a cause or altruism.'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "... In terms of bidding, the odds [favor] Verizon because Verizon can afford to overpay $105 million; 105 million handsets plus the assets of AOL and Yahoo. You're looking at what can be the largest mobile network in the world. … The epicenter of growth around media is mobile advertising. So Verizon can probably come in and spill a billion or two billion bucks to get this thing over."

Watch the video

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'For a fashion house, jewelry collections are brand extensions,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury, Co-editor of Luxury: History Culture Consumption and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York. 'These allow the brand to reach out to a broader audience whose interests are not focused on fashion exclusively and incentivize existing customers to spend more on brand extensions,' she said. 'While brand extensions may be priced to move the brand lower in the pyramid of luxury brands, in the case of Dior, its line of high jewelry is intended to reinforce the luxury status of the fashion house. In that sense, Dior’s jewelry collections are complementary to the creations of its fashion lines.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Selections are made by a team that includes both store buyers and MoMA curators. Both perspectives are important because the Store is considered as an integrated extension of the Museum that reflects the organization’s design philosophies."

Womens Wear Daily
 
Excerpt from Women's Wear Daily -- "'It will be the end of the billion-dollar brand. By trying to mean something to more people, the luxury brand [actually] means less to [everyone],' he concluded. That thought is predicated on the view that luxury is about having something that no one else has, even though that inherently also means fewer sales. 'Shifting from large megabrands to small specific brands will disrupt every facet of the fashion industry,' Lenihan concluded."

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Excerpt from Associated Press -- "Scott Galloway, clinical professor of marketing at NYU Stern School of Business, said Apple risked public sentiment turning against the company as people became more informed about the case, and particularly if Apple lost. For now, he said, 'the line isn't going to be any shorter for the iPhone because the FBI in concert with a third party figured out a way to hack into one phone. I haven't heard anybody say "That's it, I'm switching to Samsung."'"

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Excerpt from CNBC -- "In creating opportunities for businesses to reach consumers directly, Ghose points out that social media has also created opportunities for a wide range of job seekers. He said there is a need for graphic designers who create a platform's look, a need for security specialists who ensure data is protected, a need for app developers for mobile sites and a need for data scientists who mine the platform's data to parse clients whims and wishes."

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business, said Amazon would one day go even further by analyzing customer shopping patterns and proactively sending people replenishments of common household items. 'I think that’s where this is all headed,' he said. 'I will get a box once a week with stuff they figure I need.'"

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Excerpt from TopMBA -- "'The financial results of companies that operate in the luxury sector have piqued MBA students' interest. Many more people wish to understand why is it that these companies can weather most financial crises practically unscathed,' reflects Thomaï Serdari, a professor specializing in luxury brands at NYU Stern. She notes that after the school introduced the specialization, there was increasing interest in high-end product development across the board – quality and prestige, it seems, will always out."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "Scott Galloway, a professor at NYU's Stern School of Business, said that tech companies 'age in dog years, so the founders are usually still alive. By the time a [consumer-packaged goods] company goes through maturity and decline, they're talking to the grandkids. Some of it is just the pace of the lifecycle.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Accelerators serve an important need for startups that may have great, viable ideas but lack the diversity of expertise to pull them off and maximize their potential. Accelerators serve important roles for existing companies, infusing them with new perspectives, an entrepreneurial spirit and providing cutting-edge learning through mutual problem solving."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "[Alter] said plenty of people want to leave reviews, 'especially if they're really really happy or really really unhappy.' Alter said companies use this feedback in different ways. 'So some will just use the numbers as a threshold just to help them make very broad personnel decisions,' Alter said 'Others might even tie compensation to the numbers.'"

christian science monitor
Excerpt from Christian Science Monitor -- "The 2011 film 'The Adjustment Bureau,' which combined aspects of a thriller and a romance, was marketed using separate trailers aimed at women and at men, write Al Lieberman and Patricia Esgate in their 2011 book 'The Definitive Guide to Entertainment Marketing.' 'The trailers were accurate in their use of footage from the film but simply focused on the action and drama for the male audience and made the romantic scenes more prominent and expansive for the female audience,' they write. 'Neither audience was disappointed because both were satisfied by the story, content, and elements each was seeking.'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think they're really trying to squeeze this turnip as hard as they can, right? Little too big, little too small. But this is basically the iPhone 5 with updated components, and a lot of people like the small phone. So it makes a lot of sense. It's evolutionary, not revolutionary. But they'll get incremental profits and margins because this is arguably the first tech product in history that its margins have expanded as it's matured. People still love the iPhone."

fortune logo feature
Excerpt from Fortune -- "...it’s a tempting proposition: For only a few billion dollars, we can bring broadband connectivity to poor families, providing them with no less than an improved chance in life. The ultimate answer, of course, is more complicated. And it is a mistake to think that mere access to the Internet is going to close the gap between rich and poor."

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Excerpt from OZY -- "Today, InMobi comes up as the kind of company Google might buy, though Google declined to comment. 'It would be good for Google,' Ghose says, adding that InMobi is 'a bit away' from being true competition for Google or Facebook. For InMobi to wear the big-kid shoes in its own right, Ghose figures it’d want to ace the data game, getting access to really 'fine-grained' data about user preference."

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Excerpt from Eater -- "Restaurants drawing down-the-block-lines is not a new phenomenon. 'Humans move in herds,' says Adam Alter, a behavioral economist and marketing professor at New York University Stern School of Business. 'When one or two influential people —€” or a larger number of everyday people —€” flock to a product, their endorsement suggests to other people that the product is worth pursuing.'"

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'This is a different kind of transparency,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury, Co-editor of Luxury: History Culture Consumption and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York. 'It is not about the heritage or artisanship of the brand (one takes these for granted) but rather about the creative process of designing new objects for Petit h, all of which are crafted with discarded materials from the parent brand, Hermès.'"

new york magazine
Excerpt from New York Magazine -- "Many memory researchers believe in the so-called 'end effect.' When we evaluate something that happened to us, the thinking goes, the final moments of it are disproportionately influential. ... But a new study suggests it might not be. Writing in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, doctors Stephanie Tully of the University of Southern California and Tom Meyvis of New York University present a set of experimental findings that, taken together, suggest the end effect may not be real."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "Why do so many disgruntled voters threaten to leave the country, only to see so few actually follow through? Because people overestimate how much pain they’ll feel when they experience a dreaded outcome."

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Excerpt from HousingWire -- "'If you’re only embracing incremental change, instead of disruptive change, your path becomes narrower and narrower. By the time you’re at the end of that path your customers have forsaken you.' Williams cited the example of Blockbuster — wildly successful at the time — shunning the idea of Netflix when they were presented with it. And Blackberry, the symbol of success a few years ago, now akin to the Motorola brick phone."

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Excerpt from WFPL -- "Disruption and innovation, it's not another transient measurement fad. It's what drives economic growth. So if you don't innovate, if you don't disrupt, you can't grow."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Scott Galloway, a marketing professor at the Stern School of Business at NYU, said it's clear what Uber needs to do in response: First, acknowledge what happened. Second, make sure it's the company's top person, the CEO, who publicly addresses the issues. 'The third is you have to over-correct,' Galloway said, 'They have to announce immediately a serious of additional screening tools that they're implementing.'"

BusinessBecause
Excerpt from BusinessBecause -- "'I take students on visits to places "off the beaten path" to help them gain an appreciation of hand-made luxury goods,' says Thomaï Serdari, director of the program’s luxury marketing specialization. ... 'NYU Stern gives [students] access to the strongest luxury retail market in the US,' says Thomaï. 'Our network of graduates is global, strong, and renowned for its effectiveness.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Material ConneXion is a resource worth knowing about, as a potentially important partner in product design, interior design, and creative development processes."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'What Chanel is, in other words, is a well-defined brand,' [Serdari] said. 'This is extremely important, not only in the context of the previous 13 chapters that spoke to individual elements of Chanel’s mythology and heritage, but most importantly in the context of today’s fashion world and the challenges a lot of fashion brands face as they try to preserve their heritage while also move into the future.'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think you're going to see a couple dozen companies bid for this. This is a real asset that's been placed in the wrong hands. ... You have the chairman of the company now issuing press releases discussing their strategy and talking about how they've formed a special committee of the board."

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Excerpt from The Daily Mail -- "Depending on location of the subway and the mobile user, people may be shopping for a slew of different items, largely influenced by their setting. ‘People at a crowded restaurant or stadium may focus on food, companions, or a game, rather than the ads,’ says Ghose."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "There's real value here. I mean, in an environment where one of the most difficult resources to capture is attention, you have an asset that, despite that it's declining fairly rapidly, it still is one of the most trafficked sites in the world. You couple that with tens of billions of dollars sitting on the sidelines from limited partners who want the general partners at private equity funds to put their capital to work. This asset is going to go at, I believe, a higher price than the market is expecting."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Many food, beverage, health and beauty aide, retail, furniture and hotel brands have come to the realization that smell, taste, sound, feel, texture, visual image and packaging all combine in the brain to create indelible impressions and enhance experiences. Optimizing them can lead to a 'wow' reaction and make the product, service, hotel or store memorable, buzz-worthy and stand out at the point of purchase."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "HueGroup’s new color platform has the potential to change the way color decisions are made, and there’s really no end to the possibilities of how it can be used. Because it so comprehensively covers all the most important questions about color, it should be a welcome and invaluable resource."

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Excerpt from Racked -- "By and large, the marketing stunts have served their purposes well. 'It’s really to get people talking and to get the buzz around it going, which provides all that free publicity,' says Priya Raghubir, a marketing professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business."

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Excerpt from OZY -- "Ola Cabs, India’s version of Uber, has gained an upper hand in the market by allowing consumers to pay in cash; same goes for Flipkart, which allows cash on delivery. 'Society in India loves to touch and feel products,' Ghose says. He figures any new ecommerce venture has some hard work to do in terms of customer attitudes."

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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "'When you talk about extreme wealth, you’ll see terms like "sexy" bandied about,' regardless of the product, said Adam Alter, an associate professor of marketing at the New York University Stern School of Business. Luxury products strive for uniqueness, he says, and it makes sense that sales people use impassioned language to set their brand apart."

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'Social media is the laxative of the fashion system,' said Scott Galloway, the founder and chairman of the digital consultancy L2. 'It makes everyone digest everything much faster: trends, product discovery.'"
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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "What I think is going on is there's a cult of personality problem. Basically Jack [Dorsey] wants to be to Twitter what Steve Jobs was to Apple, meaning the founder who comes back to save the company and normally, it's assumed that a charismatic CEO can motivate the rank and file and the rest of the company to innovate. I think it has to be deeper than that. Jack has to actually build a culture where everybody is innovating and contributing."

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Excerpt from Bankrate -- "'Is it a gimmick? No. Is it a festival which marketers have leveraged relentlessly to make a dime? Yes,' Raghubir says. 'The winter is normally not an ideal time to go shopping because it's cold, it's rainy. People have just had a load of gifts, both that they have bought for others and that they have received. So it's something to try and get them to spend a little more.'"

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'Their target audience is narrower than Burger King or McDonalds. In today’s market you have to do that,' said Russell Winer, a marketing professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'Tastes are varied across market segments, you have to think about reaching a narrow audience that will be turned on to your brand.'"

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Excerpt from BuzzFeed News -- "'I don’t think that the lawsuits are frivolous at all,' Raghubir of NYU said. 'I believe they really put companies on watch. To say, "When you are advertising a regular sale price, we are watching. So be careful before you try, for lack of a better word, to trick us."'"

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Excerpt from CNBC -- "'Ten years ago, the focus was on the Super Bowl ad itself,' said Russell Winer, professor of marketing at NYU's Stern School of Business. 'What's changed today is that the buzz prior to the Super Bowl ad, about the Super Bowl ad, and the buzz after the show has tremendously increased the value of Super Bowl advertising.'"

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Excerpt from BBC -- "Kendall Jenner, who shot to fame thanks to the Keeping Up with the Kardashians reality TV show, has been dubbed the 'ultimate Instagirl' for her huge social media fan base: 48 million followers on Instagram and 15.3 million on Twitter. It was probably this status as the most-followed model on Instagram, as much as her looks or talent, that scored her the top job as the face of cosmetics giant Estee Lauder, says Mr Galloway. 'You're seeing a reshaping of an industry,' he argues. 'My friends don't forward me a picture of a really great air conditioner, but forwarding fashion is fun and interesting.'"

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'This is recognition that the future of retail — of which they could likely be the most dominant force — is multichannel,' said Scott Galloway, a professor who teaches marketing and branding at New York University."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "This is a siren call saying everybody should get out their pencils and if they're interested in Yahoo, to reach out to their banker. But this is fairly explicit, extraordinary behavior for the chairman to say essentially, 'We're for sale.'"

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Excerpt from Marketing Magazine -- "One reason, says Galloway, is that if you are willing to pay, you can now easily avoid advertising. Sign up to Spotify and you can skip the ads. Buy a pricey iPhone and ad blockers are fitted as standard. Download your favourite TV show from iTunes and you get it without the annoying ads. As Galloway puts it: 'Advertising is becoming a tax only poor people pay.'"

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Excerpt from Fast Company -- "'It makes sense that the features of your logo are going to have this effect,' Meyvis says. 'It’s what’s called priming—the idea that you prime certain concepts in someone’s mind by showing them something that’s associated with this concept.'"

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Excerpt from Poets & Quants -- "...the real question for students as they go through their education at an MBA program is not, 'Will I have a successful business at the end of this program or am I on my way to an episode of Shark Tank or a big valuation with a VC?' The real question is, 'How many bold new experiments did I get started during my educational journey here?' Those experiments, that constant moving arrangement of ingredients into new recipes to test, is a form of what we often call innovation capital. So it’s treating every idea that you come up with as an item of investment in its own right."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'The piece that was introduced [at the start of the millennium] was innovative in its symbolism (zero one, the binary code that describes all life and allows it to evolve as well) but safe in its choice of material, a uniform shade of gold,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury, Co-editor of Luxury: History Culture Consumption and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York."

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Excerpt from The Globe and Mail -- "'Every media company in the world has visions of a buy button but it hasn’t worked,' Mr. Galloway says. 'It’s a consumer behaviour thing, when I’m drinking coffee and reading the paper in the morning, I’m not in a buying frame of mind.'"

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Excerpt for Business of Fashion -- "... Luxury megabrands have not been shy about the opportunity, investing heavily in both their own outlet stores and partnerships with off-price retailers. ... But for brands that rely on marketing their products as exclusive, offering items for up to 50, 60 or even 70 percent less than retail price can seriously undermine the perceived value of their products, says Serdari."

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Excerpt from CNBC -- "'Although public opinion fluctuates based on political, religious, and other demographics and in response to major mass shootings or presidential politics, there appears to be a majority bipartisan desire to establish certain level of gun control — at least as measured by response to the question in the GSS,' said Vishal Singh, a professor at New York University's Stern School of Business. Singh has closely studied the general social survey and has constructed an interactive visualization tool based on GSS data."

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Excerpt from The New York Post -- "'The majority of these sites are gone or dying,' said Scott Galloway, founder of L2 Inc. and a professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think it's moved beyond leadership at this point. I think this is, 'this is over, it's time to sell or spin, and if we need new leadership and a new board, fine.'"

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Excerpt from Macleans -- "'I hope that firms will realize that consumers prefer simple and straightforward pricing to pricing that they do not understand,' says Vicki Morwitz, a professor of marketing at the Stern School of Business at New York University. 'While consumers may be fooled once by paying for an unexpected surcharge because they do not want to have to begin their shopping all over or admit that they made a mistake, they will be less likely to want to do business again with a firm they feel tricked them into paying more than they thought they should.'"
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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'It’s going to generate some buzz and it’s a fun thing to do, but I think it’ll have limited if any commercial success,' said Samuel Craig, director of NYU Stern’s entertainment, media & technology initiative."
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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Scott Galloway, professor of marketing at NYU, said one reason those companies are still on board is that live sporting events are one of the few current television experiences that maintain a captive audience. 'In a digital age, it’s very hard to find scale,' he said. 'The temptation to get in front of a billion eyeballs is just too great.'"
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Excerpt from Medical Xpress -- "'The general perception is that these taxes need to be substantial, at least 20% and often as high as 50%, to have a meaningful impact. This would be highly regressive since low-income consumers spend a greater proportion of their disposable income on food. Here, we have compelling field-based evidence that such taxes don't need to be high to be effective,' noted Singh."
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Excerpt from the Financial Times -- "Scott Galloway, founder of research firm L2 and professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern Business School, expects [social shopping] will continue to underwhelm because social networks are for social activities, not shopping. 'Social still plays a huge role in retail or a brands’ business, but it’s just not where the actual retailing gets done,' Mr Galloway says."
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Excerpt from The New Yorker -- "Faced with a string of these superficial decisions, many people become introspective. They begin to question whether their lives are meaningful. At the same time, they sense that meaningfulness comes from the margins of human experience—that it flowers during times of great joy, pain, frustration, or hardship. For this reason, even those who are privileged feel compelled to court new challenges. Some of us decide on a month without alcohol, or undertake an act of charity, or set out on a ten-kilometer run. Ashprihanal Aalto, Trishul Cherns, and Michael Bielik pursue meaningfulness in a different way: by running, running, and running some more."
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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Over the past few years, the trend that started with Paris-based Ladurée and Pierre Hermé innovating with an unprecedented range of exotic macaron cookies and fillings, has escalated geometrically to include new innovators who are 'blowing out' other traditional sweet categories in previously unimaginable flavors, designs, colors, and textures. Many of these pioneers already have beautiful cookbooks. Paris food retail is getting more and more specialized, and customers are making the effort to travel considerable distances and happy to wait in line to buy a single-type of product, as long as it’s the best of it’s kind and there’s a 'wow' factor and sense of discovery. Here are 7 of the best sweet category dedicated shops, with an eighth example in the condiment category: French mustard."
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Excerpt from Reuters -- "Beyond featuring women, the company appears to be tailoring some of its messages to females, said Alvin Lieberman, a marketing professor at New York University's Stern School of Business. In a four-minute comedy sketch on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live,' Harrison Ford and Chewbacca resolved a purported feud with an endearing, hug-it-out moment. 'That is not what your high-adrenaline, action-oriented male population is looking to see,' Lieberman said of the video, which has been viewed more than 1.1 million times on YouTube. 'It sells the characters.'"
BusinessBecause
Excerpt from BusinessBecause -- "'It is not just about cutting direct costs,' says Professor Anindya Ghose, director of NYU Stern’s Center for Business Analytics. 'It is about identifying high-performing employees, predicting their next performance milestone, and carving out their trajectories and rewarding them.'"
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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "The companies are targeting $3 billion in cost savings. DuPont said it plans to cut about 10% of its global workforce before the actual merger. 'These three companies will not have more employees than two companies did,' said Mr. Galloway. 'This is going to be a lesson in human resources.'"
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Excerpt from OZY -- "Nike ... opted not to renew Curry’s contract when it came up two years ago — right before his title-winning MVP performance. 'You make a decision on an athlete, and then keep your fingers crossed,' says Lieberman. Now, Under Armour has Curry through 2024, with CEO Kevin Plank publicly saying he wants to create a 'billion-dollar basketball business' around the diminunitive point guard. For now, Nike still holds 95 percent of the $5.2 billion basketball shoe market, and Lieberman is skeptical one athlete is enough to shift the balance of power."'
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Excerpt from Yahoo -- "The more unusual your name, the more likely you are to see and interact with the world differently. 'It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy that begins with an unusual name and ultimately leads to unconventional or creative thinking,' Adam Alter, a professor of psychology and marketing at New York University who has studied how names can affect the way people are perceived, told Yahoo Parenting earlier this year. All of which is just logical: When you grow up with a name that nobody else around you has, you become used to, and thus less afraid of, deviating from the norm."
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Excerpt from MarketWatch -- "More than 90% of people said they believe it’s better to eat a well-balanced diet than to use diet products in a 2015 survey of 2,000 Internet users by market research company Mintel. ... As a result, there has been a shift from touting the explicit weight-loss benefits of fitness and food products to promoting an overall lifestyle that is sustainable, said Priya Raghubir, the chair of the marketing department at New York University’s Stern School of Business."
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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I would say the board has been infected with a severe case of common sense, and when you have an asset that is trading at less than zero, the disposition of that asset is accretive to shareholders. And they recognize that. They're going to sell Yahoo. It's time for this soap opera to end. ... It's going to be good for shareholders. ... It's the right thing to do."
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Excerpt from LinkedIn -- "Just a few years ago, Best Buy looked like it was on its way to failure, especially as its competitor Circuit City filed for bankruptcy in 2008. The company has since turned itself around and is even considered an undervalued stock at times. A big part of the turnaround was due to CEO Hubert Joly’s 'Renew Blue' program, implemented three years ago. However, L2 data shows digital investment played a big role in preserving and improving the company’s value."
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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Reverse mentoring can be a fun and enlightening experience for both parties. It frees Marketing execs of the embarrassment of looking and being out of date and out of touch, and importantly for the business, helps execs understand and adopt new approaches (assuming they’re better) more quickly. It’s a win/win way to infuse new perspectives in the organization."
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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Colette has been ahead of its time since its inception, trailblazing collaborations, new ways of merchandizing, fun combinations of product categories, and the embrace of constant change. As long as this mother daughter duo continues their complementary partnership, it will continue to be the one to watch. Other retailers can observe, learn, and be inspired to do their own experimenting."

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Excerpt from Chain Store Age -- "Given mobile is the primary access point to online retail, brands must position mobile as a higher priority than desktop. Mobile users’ native experiences fit smaller screens, therefore graphics and navigation tools become more important. Mobile experience also requires frequent refreshing, since online customers have come to expect novelty and change."

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Excerpt from Gizmodo -- "The original Dunning-Kruger effect ... showed up when participants were asked to rate their performance after a task had been completed. It relies on the fact that the lack of knowledge exhibited by those scoring in the bottom percentile would render them ill-equipped to accurately evaluate their own performance."

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Excerpt from WIRED -- "'I think it’s based on associations rather than physiology,' says NYU psychologist Adam Alter, who wrote a book, Drunk Tank Pink, that examines this phenomenon. 'I’m open to being convinced otherwise, I just haven’t been yet.'"

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- “While we are not used to storytelling around the processes of perfume production, the documentaries capture the attention of the consumer with powerful visuals, pertinent context, and enriching background sounds as to prepare the senses for the olfactory experience that each perfume promises."

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Excerpt from WalletHub -- "Consumers need to be aware that while these deep discounts are often very good, they are offered to lure customers into the store with the hope that once they are there they will buy more. So, consumers should plan and be disciplined about what they want to buy and where they want to buy it and have done their homework before on who offers the best prices for the items they want to buy. Consumers who go after these deals should have a back up plan made ahead of time of what they will do if they are not one of the lucky ones to get the deal."

Professor Priya Raghubir weighs in on Hallmark's latest ad campaign.

November 19, 2015

abcnews


Excerpt from ABC News-- “I was surprised because ... Hallmark’s commercials are annoying sweet,” she told ABC News. “I wouldn’t expect this from Hallmark. The company is making fun of its own stereotype, this picture-perfect world.”
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Excerpt from The Huffington Post -- "...businesses can start on a new course in one day that will change them forever. All it takes is a willingness to embrace new ways of thinking."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'Amazon, Google, Facebook and Apple are all bumping up against each other as their businesses are becoming more and more similar,' said Scott Galloway, a professor who teaches marketing and branding at New York University's Stern School of Business. He noted that Amazon's move is not the first barb these firms have thrown at each other; Apple's move to block ads on its phones, for example, was seen as a way to undercut Google's advertising business."

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Excerpt from NDTV -- "'Technologically-driven solutions fall short in addressing an issue that is inherently social in nature,' said one of the researchers Anindya Ghose from New York University Stern School of Business in the US. 'Instead of engaging in a technological rat race with extremists, we should consider incorporating critical literacies - including digital media, anti-racism and social justice - into school curricula as an alternative strategy,' Ghose noted."

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Excerpt from TIME -- "In a talk earlier this year, Scott Galloway of research firm L2 explained why this is such a big deal for Nike. 'There is a tectonic shift taking place in apparel, the second-largest consumer category in the world. Essentially, people are moving from denim to sweatpants,' he said. 'It sounds minor but it’s a huge trend in a gigantic industry.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "'When a company is trying to reposition itself, for example from being a value brand to a more prestigious brand, this change must also get reflected in its packaging from being more basic to being fancier,' says NYU’s Raghubir. 'A great example is when Tropicana went the other route, of simplifying its package design, and there was a consumer backlash. Consumers do infer quality from the package.'"

BusinessBecause
Excerpt from BusinessBecause -- "Professor Thomaï Serdari, strategist in luxury marketing and branding at NYU Stern School of Business, said that there will be both new career and business opportunities as a result of luxury’s digital drive. 'We are experiencing a shift,' she said."

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Excerpt from Chicago Tribune -- "'Look at the symbolism,' Alter said, 'or how it sounds. Does it sound mellifluous or otherwise really appealing?' In other words, does it sound like the thing it represents?"

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Excerpt from PayScale.com -- "Two psychologists, David Dunning and Justin Kruger have worked on cluelessness, finding among other things that incompetence is bliss, as well as numerous highly relevant business insights."

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Excerpt from The New Yorker -- "Ultimately, the mob myth depends on psychological distance, a term coined by the New York University psychologist Yaacov Trope to describe the phenomenon of mental distancing that takes place when we separate ourselves from events, people, emotions, or concepts. In some cases, that distance comes naturally. As painful events recede into the past, our perceptions soften; when we physically remove ourselves from emotionally disturbing situations, our emotions cool. In other cases, we need to deliberately cultivate distance—to 'gain perspective.' Trope likens it to the old cliché of missing the forest for the trees: you can wander around in the trees forever or, through training or external intervention, realize that you need to step back to see the full vista."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "The new labels will also include updated serving sizes to better reflect how much people typically consume. But this change may create a troubling unintended consequence: It could actually increase how much food people eat."

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Excerpt from Hot Topics -- "As the people running formal entrepreneurship education globally, here are the top 100 professors of entrepreneurship cultivating the leaders of tomorrow."

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Excerpt from Poets & Quants -- "For me, one of the big things I take pride in is research and publications. One of the first things we instituted after I became dean was the Stern Program For Undergraduate Research, which really enabled our students to get first-hand experience with research projects."
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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Today, because of social media, which are otherwise powerful marketing tools, our attention span gets shorter and shorter,' Ms. Serdari said. 'It is much more appealing to get someone’s attention with a very short and well edited film and do that several times over a long period of time rather than invest in long films that no one has the time to watch...In 14 short seconds one is drawn into the pulsating crowd of paparazzi and celebrities...,' Ms. Serdari said. 'It all develops through Ferragamo’s own penetrating gaze. He went, he saw, he conquered. Today, the brand stands where he once stood.'"

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Excerpt from Boston Globe -- "The meaning [of a name] is important, too, notes one of the study’s coauthors, Adam Alter, a psychologist at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'We’re sensitive to associations — positive and negative — between any two concept,' Alter said. The effect 'is probably small, but it’s automatic and we’re unlikely to be able to avoid it completely when we consider people by their names.'... The name Trump carries a range of strong associations... As Alter points out, the word 'implies victory and dominance.' ... Trump himself may derive confidence from these strong, positive meanings to trumpet forth his own eloquence, Alter suggests — although he added, 'Of course the effect of [Trump’s] name is likely to be far weaker than the effects of his inherited wealth and self-assured personality.'"

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Excerpt from LinkedIn -- "The top tier customer who is willing to spend $5k and up on a new Apple gadget is one who values both technology and design. The collaboration between the two brands responds to both these preferences. The Hermès customer (who may already own an Hermès watch among others) is the same customer who equips her life in all products Apple. She values the quality and taste of the French brand and wishes that all products were designed with such refinement."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think Google is leaking value to Facebook. If you look, Facebook now does a billion queries a day, versus Google's three billion. Google is basically one core brand that is doing very well. Facebook [has the] best acquisitions in tech; 20% of all mobile time is on now on Facebook... Facebook's going to be the most valuable company in the world within 3 years - it has meaningful relationships with 2.2 billion people."

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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "Most people who sign up for an unlimited service subscription expect to up their consumption, she says. But after a week’s binge, 'You’ll return to your former state.' Still, unlimited plans offer intangible benefits. Consumers love the feeling of freedom, she says. And studies have shown that the psychological pain of paying $120 at the start of the month is far less than shelling out $4 a day for a morning cappuccino."

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Excerpt from Reuters -- "This is a fundamental shift in how companies and entrepreneurs operate. This is going to affect the venture capital industry. It already is affecting [it], in some ways. It's going to affect how people who want to raise money think about raising money. This is a very powerful means of potential investors and entrepreneurs coming together, bypassing... the angel investors, the venture capitalists."

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Excerpt from Hub Magazine -- "The consumer always wins. If you give consumers three choices — a great e-commerce site with no stores, a great retailer with great stores but bad digital, or the multi-channel retailer — they will say door number three. The future looks more like Williams Sonoma, Sephora or Macy’s than it does Amazon."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "In one experiment, half of the participants were shown the current nutrition label for mini chocolate chip cookies, and the other half saw the proposed label. Then they were told they would be offered some, and asked how many they expected to eat. Those who had seen the new label, which used six cookies as a serving size, said they expected to eat more than those who saw the current one, which used three cookies as a serving size."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "I also believe that Amazon cannot survive as a pure-play retailer. Stores are the new black in the world of e-commerce. We’ve discovered these incredibly flexible robust warehouses called stores … retailers are not befuddled prey waiting around to be disrupted. They are in fact growing their e-commerce businesses."
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Excerpt from Entrepreneur -- "As Ghose explains, investors may determine that investing $1 million across 10 startups might make more sense than investing $1 million in stocks during a bear market. 'For some, it will make more sense to invest in the stock market, but for some it will actually make more sense to invest in startups,' he says."

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Excerpt from Ad Age -- "Now the image of Amazon as a grueling place to work, and Bezos as an insensitive taskmaster, is harder to shake and will probably prove troublesome for some time. While in the past such a report may not have been as damaging, today's consumers -- led by millennials -- are different. They care more about what sort of culture is behind the brands they like."

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Excerpt from The Conversation -- "We give our data to marketers (both willingly and inadvertently), and in return we expect to receive highly curated and personalized offers on our smartphones. Many consumers have even become resigned to the idea that they have little control over their data, and that this is the future of the world we will inhabit."

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Excerpt from CBS -- "'The disadvantage of having them be W-2 employees is simple. It's cost. It's more expensive,' NYU Stern School of Business professor Scott Galloway said. It's expensive but a great marketing strategy, according to Galloway. 'Consumers claim they are very concerned about the well-being of the employees at a company,' he said."

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Excerpt from The Boston Globe -- "'The basic dilemma is build or buy,' said C. Samuel Craig, director of the Entertainment, Media and Technology Initiative at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'It’s very difficult for large companies to build internally because the corporate structure is risk-averse, and it’s hard to move quickly. If you see something out there that’s already working, the temptation is to buy or buy in.'"

Womens Wear Daily
 
Excerpt from WWD -- "'Firms and organizations that compete on price — Amazon, China, Wal-Mart, McDonald’s — will view employees as a cost and the majority of innovation will be around how to get more, for less, from them,' said Scott Galloway, New York University marketing professor and founder of L2 Inc. 'This leads to companies that can be brutal places to work.'"

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Excerpt from AdAge -- "As for the psychology of the whole business, Tom Meyvis, professor of marketing at the Stern School of Business at New York University, says it is likely there isn't 'too much research going on' when developing IVRs. 'The large aim of this business is to control cost,' he said. 'That's why we don't have live operators right away.'"

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Excerpt from The Huffington Post -- "It may seem counterintuitive, but in order to inspire free thinking, the first step is often to set some limits. While some academics and consultants advocate not restricting brainstorming creativity in any way, I've found allowing infinite options with few guidelines can paralyze innovation. Creativity flourishes when some parameters exist for what brands stand for and the brand equity elements that marketing tactics and line-extensions must protect and extend. Apple is a great example of a brand that adheres to a strong identity and vision for what it stands for, and the company continues to innovate while staying true to their brand parameters."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'America and consumers love to forgive,' says Galloway. 'It’s like a relationship. When your spouse gets angry at you, the easiest way to end the issue, "You’re right, I’m sorry. This is what I’m going to do to address the issue." It’s the same thing in the world of business.'"

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Excerpt from Los Angeles Times -- "Tom Meyvis, a professor of marketing at New York University's Stern School of Business, said removing gender labels from toys gives more power to the consumer, a trend in marketing. 'To some extent, you give more control to the customer,' he said. 'So customers can decide for themselves what is the ideal product for their son or daughter, rather than being told this is the category your child falls into.'"

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Excerpt from Racked -- "Thomai Serdari, a luxury marketing professor at NYU, says Signet's play for the male consumer is also apparent in where and when its ads are placed: the company spends millions to air commercials during sporting events.'Their branding goes hand-in-hand with how the average American consumer equates relationship milestones with jewelry,' she says. 'Signet tries to stay on top of the mind of the consumer who will watch a football game, see an ad on TV, and equate that brand with the next gift he needs to buy his wife.'"

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Excerpt from Business Insider -- "In a New York University study, researchers found that people with easier-to-pronounce names often have higher-status positions at work. One of the psychologists, Adam Alter, explains to Wired, 'When we can process a piece of information more easily, when it's easier to comprehend, we come to like it more.' In a further study, Alter also found that companies with simpler names and ticker symbols tended to perform better in the stock market."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "[In] the next quarter, if Twitter shows negative user growth, which we haven't seen across any social media platform that's still around, you could have a chill that could set off an incredible decrease in valuations, not only across social media, but across the market. I think Twitter is about to play a more important role in the markets than people think."

BusinessBecause
Excerpt from BusinessBecause -- "'Companies now need marketing managers who are comfortable with data analytics,' said Anindya Ghose, professor of marketing at NYU Stern School of Business."

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Excerpt from HBS Working Knowledge -- "When faced with a decision on how to allocate resources between themselves and others, some people are 'pro-social,' meaning they are likely to value more equal distributions of resources, while others are 'pro-self,' meaning they try and maximize value for themselves. ... Santana explores these questions in a new working paper, Because We're Partners: How Social Values and Relationship Norms Influence Consumer Payments in Pay-What-You-Want Contexts, written with Vicki G. Morwitz, the Harvey Golub Professor of Business Leadership and Professor of Marketing at New York University's Stern School of Business."
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Excerpt from Mashable -- "'It's one thing to put infrastructure together, it's another thing to get enough ventures around you where it suddenly starts to look like the place to go as opposed to someone having to be the pioneer to go,' says Jeffrey Carr, a business professor at New York University who focuses on entrepreneurship issues. 'There just is a huge hurdle for this kind of thing to work.'"
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Excerpt from Financial Times -- "Mobile payment may ease the ‘pain’ of spending but could make you poorer...The academics Priya Raghubir and Joydeep Srivastava have found that we are less likely to remember purchases made by electronic means."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "'Amazon cannot survive as a pure-play retailer,' said Scott Galloway, founder of L2 Research and a professor at the NYU Stern School of Business, at the January DLD15 conference. 'Stores are the new black in the world of ecommerce. We have discovered these incredibly robust, flexible warehouses called stores.'"

Professor Bryan Bollinger's research on purchasing habits in grocery stores is discussed

July 15, 2015
 
new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "When people bring reusable bags to the grocery store, ... they are more likely to take another environmentally-friendly step and buy more organic products than they might otherwise have. Then, feeling good about themselves, they treat themselves to indulgences like cookies, ice cream or potato chips, a new study in The Journal of Marketing found...The researchers attribute the changes to two distinct, largely unconscious processes. The first, called the priming effect, comes into play when you bring reusable bags and then 'behave in a congruent fashion, and buy environmentally friendly products,' said Bryan Bollinger, a study co-author and assistant professor at Duke."

bloomberg logo feat
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "'This makes all the sense in the world,' said Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business, in a phone interview. 'Tesla is not an automobile company, it’s a luxury company.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "Choosing the right claims, the right number of claims, and the optimal size and placement of each is a moving target that has to be constantly reassessed among all potential target consumer segments.  It’s not always intuitively obviously.  The good news is that digitally testing a range of options has never been easier."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'If you're the film that gets in before the weekend, you begin to build buzz,' says New York University professor Al Lieberman, a former film and television marketer. 'It's out in the press immediately and on social media right away.' ...There are some risks of opening early. People are even more likely to spread the word about a movie they didn't like, Lieberman says, especially if they're a diehard fan who has stayed up until the wee hours to see it."

BusinessBecause
Excerpt from BusinessBecause -- "There are also opportunities in marketing, according to Professor Thomaï Serdari, strategist in luxury marketing and branding at NYU Stern School of Business. 'The field of luxury marketing, as an academic and business discipline, is growing as the luxury market grows,' she said."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'Consumers are basically browsing and decision-making has moved online,' said Scott Galloway, a professor who teaches marketing and branding at New York University’s Stern School of Business."

refinery29 logo
Excerpt from Refinery29 -- "'Placebos work precisely because you expect them to have a particular effect,' Dr. Alter explains. 'There can’t be a placebo effect unless someone — or the text on a product label — suggests that it should have a certain effect on you.'"

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Having shifted away from mere marketing of products, most luxury brands have redirected their focus on marketing experiences,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York. 'The best way to do that digitally is to create a 360-degree overview of the brand that highlights the processes of production, the people involved, the various stages outlined in bringing a concept to life and to the hands of the consumer and finally, the context within which it all takes place,' she said."

new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "Still, the trend in campaign stores, even in the more basic emporia, is limited-edition merchandise geared to specific events: LGBT pride, in the case of Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Sanders (think rainbow stripes); Father’s Day in the case of Mr. Paul. Such collections provide not only another reason to shop/donate, but also insight into what issue may be most important to a particular supporter. 'It’s a signal,' said Scott Galloway, the founder of the digital research firm L2 and a clinical professor of marketing at the New York University Stern School of Business. 'I would say a faint signal, but definitely a signal.'"

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Excerpt from L2 ThinkTank -- "When Facebook first went public, I valued it as a Google wanna-be — a company that if it was like Google would be a success. … When I value Facebook today, I no longer value it as a Google wanna-be. … Google is going to be the Facebook wanna-be in this market." -- Aswath Damodaran

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Excerpt from Harvard Business Review -- "Why is it that a vacation seems like a great idea when we first plan it, but feels like more and more of a burden the closer it gets? It all comes down to distance. Over the past 15 years, quite a bit of research has focused on what Yaacov Trope and Nira Liberman call construal level theory. The idea is that the more distant some object or event is for you, the more abstractly you think about it."

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Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "'These are [brands] that really control the supply, and therefore they manipulate the market and the desire for their products,' said Thomaï Serdari, a professor who teaches luxury marketing courses at New York University."

fox news
 
Excerpt from Fox News -- "The next president will face a series of tough foreign policy decisions. How should America manage challenges from fast-rising China and respond to changes in the heart of Europe? What to do about ISIS? Should America become more involved in Iraq? Or Syria? Or Ukraine? What about Iran? Should Washington pursue more blockbuster trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership?"

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Excerpt from International Business Times --  "'I think if you're comparing Apple's service to Spotify’s, for example, there's a lot of similarity,' Craig continued. 'For that reason, given Apple's advantages, it's going to be an uphill battle for Spotify.'"

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Excerpt from Daily Mail -- "Experts say that the 'planning fallacy' - a phenomenon in which predictions about how much time is needed to complete a task are incorrectly optimistic - is one of the most difficult changes to make. Justin Kruger, a social psychologist and professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business told The Wall Street Journal’s Sumathi Reddy that despite there being lots of punishments for being late, people still find it difficult to change their habits."

bloomberg logo new
 
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "In the world of ecommerce, I believe that pure-play ecommerce has no future, that almost every pure-play ecommerce is either going to open stores or go out of business. ... Effectively, the consumer always gets what she wants. Effectively, there's three doors here. There's a great ecommerce site, that just has an ecommerce offering. There's a great retail concept with just bricks and mortar and maybe a weak ecommerce site, and then there's door number three: a Sephora, a Williams-Sonoma or Macy's that have great stores, great ecommerce and use digital as the connective tissue... and the consumer wants door number three. I think the future looks more like Macy's and Williams-Sonoma than it looks like Amazon or Net-a-Porter or Gilt."

Listen here

Additional coverage appeared on Bloomberg View and Business Insider Australia.

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "Dominique Ansel is undoubtedly the most celebrated and innovative pastry chef in the Western Hemisphere and for good reason. Aside from creating the Cronut phenomenon, he has innovated in so many other ways. He combines magic, entertainment, craft, nostalgia, analogies, complexity, surprise, shapes, interesting presentations, contrasting textures and temperatures, and wow factor into his creations."

luxury daily logo feature
Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli are a modern version of what used to be the lone creative genius, which Valentino, the man, and other great couturiers used to be,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York. 'Today, we see a much more collaborative approach to creativity even in the great famed houses of high fashion.'"

new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'Who are brands obsessed with? High-income teens and people in their 20s,' said Scott Galloway, a New York University marketing professor and chairman of L2, a research firm that studies how consumer brands use social media. 'Those people are leaving Facebook. Where are they going? Instagram. Facebook has shored up its rear flank with this important cohort with Instagram.'"

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Excerpt from Macleans -- "'People are very impressionable,” says Thomaï Serdari, an adjunct associate professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'Everyone is adding the adjective of luxury. You see this all the time with condos. They’re advertised as luxury, but you walk in and the walls are so cheap.'"

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Excerpt from Eyewitness News -- "Marketing professor Michelle Greenwald said Americans are beginning to become more aware of their health, looking for natural foods without artificial ingredients. She said customers are even willing to pay more for healthier products. 'Getting back to more natural ingredients,' she said. 'It’s a quality of life issue that’s kind of an affordable indulgence.'"

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'It’s unlikely that any of these folks will end up in retail or merchandising,' says Scott Galloway, a clinical professor of marketing at NYU's Leonard N. Stern School of Business, of the candidates offerings, regardless of party affiliation. 'These aren’t what I’d call an inspiring product mix.'"

bloomberg logo new
 
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "You're talking about media plans that take years to plan. ... Also, I think a lot of different sports agencies are looking at the brands, how they're going to respond. So I think it'll be a measured, slow unwinding. But I do think they're going to withdraw from this."

Vice logo
Excerpt from VICE -- "Anindya Ghose, co-author of that study, believes that online dating apps have had a similar effect. 'Basically what the Internet does is makes it a lot easier to find a casual partner,' he told VICE News. 'Without the internet you'd have to put effort into casual relationships, chatting with someone at the bar or hanging out in places, but these platforms make it a lot more convenient and easy. That's essentially what the primary driver is.'"

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Excerpt from CBS News -- "In its first year, Casper made more than $30 million in sales in the U.S. and Canada. 'The fact that they have so much word of mouth going is remarkable,' Williams said. 'But that word of mouth was generated by the ingenious design.'"

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "It's no longer a case of yes, Strategy A is the right direction...investors want to know that you can not only do Strategy A but you can do B, C, D or E or any combination of that if circumstances change. The problem is Yahoo hasn't put that vision out - nobody really knows how they're going to play out..."

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "Here are my top picks for pioneers embracing new forms of technology at retail, to differentiate themselves among digitally savvy target audiences. In so doing, they’re better meeting consumer needs such as product customization, or quality and speed of service and payment."

Langone Speaker Series | Greg Coleman feature
 
Greg Coleman, President of BuzzFeed and former President of HuffingtonPost.com, will join MBA students for a 2014-2015 Speaker Series event. Professor Charlie Murphy will moderate the discussion, beginning with a one-on-one interview and followed by an open Q&A session with students. 

luxury daily logo feature
Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'This is not only about brand synergies, or exposure to a captive audience of ultra wealthy prospects,' she said. 'It is mainly of each brand’s elevated status just based on the fact that they can afford the expenditure required for their presence and events at Cannes."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'Nothing is forever in TV land,' says Sam Craig, a professor at New York University. After 15 seasons spanning 13 years, he says this is an 'inexorable movement.'"

BusinessBecause
Excerpt from BusinessBecause -- "'Companies now need marketing managers who are comfortable with data analytics,' says Anindya Ghose, professor of marketing at NYU’s Stern School of Business. ... 'Students who understand the digital ecosystem and who have technical skills are much in demand,' says Professor Samuel Craig, director of NYU Stern’s Entertainment, Media and Technology MBA track."

quartz logo
Excerpt from Quartz -- "We buy things that make us somehow feel we are better—more attractive, more powerful—and that show the outside world that we’re good enough, smart enough, and people like us. Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at NYU’s Stern School of Business, goes a step further, saying the cachet that all vanity capital carries is distinctly libidinous. 'Men want to spread their seed to the four corners of the world,' he says, and women want their choice of mate. Anything that projects prestige or increases our physical attractiveness helps us accomplish those goals."

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "I think in terms of the labels or the category we put them in, that's really important. So if you call this a fitness tracking device -- FitBit, Jawbone -- their longevity is almost nonexistent. I think they're going to be replaced by Apple. But if you change the label and actually put them in this category of 'calm technology,' because the whole promise of this category is that it's going to keep us in the flow of information without constantly demanding our attention like looking at our phones. So you'll get a buzz on your wrist, or you'll be able to see it out of your peripheral vision. That category is going to be huge. There's a big future. There's going to be a lot of players. So it depends what category you put them into."

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Sam Craig teaches marketing at NYU's Stern School of Business. Craig says historically, theaters and studios typically split box office receipts 50/50. But Disney reportedly wants 60 percent of the box office for the Avengers sequel. And that could add up. 'Studios need theaters. Theaters need films to make money.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "The three brands selected have historically not been known as cutting edge, big-time marketers, and one is a non-profit. This is inspiring, as it indicates that brands don’t need mega-budgets or to be considered marketing heavy hitters to do great, impactful, clever, strategic, and insightful work. Smaller brands can create stellar programs with budgets that are less than gargantuan."

washington post logo feature
Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "Scott Galloway, a professor who teaches marketing and branding at New York University’s Stern School of Business, said he is skeptical that Jet’s pure e-commerce model can result in a viable business. 'I think [Jet] is a retailer designed by a consultant that makes sense in theory and has trouble in execution,' Galloway said."

Linkedin logo
 
Excerpt from LinkedIn -- "Department stores are alive and well in 2015. Frequently dismissed as dinosaurs outmaneuvered by digital players, department stores can not only survive the dramatic fall-off in foot traffic seen over the past few years but will ultimately fare better than pure-play e-commerce. Contrary to long-held conventional wisdom, department stores will be among the biggest winners in retail."

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Excerpt from USA Today -- "Taking a trip down memory lane isn't new for marketers, who use nostalgia to connect products to our 'need to love and be loved,' according to Scott Galloway, a clinical professor of marketing at New York University Stern School of Business... 'The idea of connecting emotion to a product is to a certain extent the definition of branding,' Galloway says."

Newsweek Logo
Excerpt from Newsweek -- "...you need to be open to hearing criticisms of the campaign rather than just evidence in its favor. When companies or brands are launching a new advertising campaign, they often 'try to confirm what they would like to do rather than play devil’s advocate,' Raghubir says."

usa today logo feature
 
Excerpt from USA Today -- "'Humans and other animals tend to glide through life unless they encounter a reason to engage more deeply with the world,' Alter said. 'Harsher weather tends to temporarily dampen your mood, which acts as a signal that everything isn't OK in the world. That makes you more vigilant and potentially hard-working, whereas sunshine can dampen your motivation by signaling that all is right in the world.'"

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "In recent years Cadillac has had little to tout besides its high end Escalade SUV. In order to become relevant again, Serdari believes the brand needs to cut back its offerings, and go upmarket to firmly re-establish itself on the high end of luxury, a place BMW, Audi and Mercedes already occupy. 'Then perhaps they can reverse their strategy and start targeting the mass market with less expensive models.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "'Google+ is already dead,' said Scott Galloway, Clinical Professor of Marketing, NYU Stern, Founder & CEO of L2, a business intelligence firm, in Munich last month. 'It has a 98% decline in engagement rate, year-over-year.'"

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Excerpt from Poets & Quants -- "Alter provides Stern students with valuable insights into one of the most important skills in business: understanding what makes people tick. ... At Stern, Hegde has received extremely high ratings for his teaching in the part-time Langone MBA program. Of particular interest to his students may be Hegde’s research finding that venture capitalists are more likely to put money into startups with executives from the same ethnic background, and that when VCs and entrepreneurs shared the same ethnicity, startups were more successful."

OZY logo
 
Excerpt from OZY -- "Names induce certain sentiments in the same way. 'What does a name remind us of, and is it appealing — does it glide off the tongue? Those are the biggest drivers in name choice,' says Adam Alter, a marketing professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business who has studied the perception of names."

quartz logo
Excerpt from Quartz -- "Many world-class brands, such as Hermès and Christolfe, are constantly introducing ever-more exclusive clubs to ensure that their customers feel a consistent, heightened sense of 'specialness.' 'The irony but also allure about [these] clubs is that no one knows the exact list of clients (other than the corporate staff), but also no one can ask to be allowed into the club,' writes Thomaï Serdari, a professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business in an email to Quartz. Serdari is the editor of Luxury: History, Culture, Consumption.. 'In other words, one may be a member without knowing it.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "[Galloway] and his team at NYU Stern have developed an algorithm that looks at more than 800 data points across four dimensions—site, digital marketing, social and mobile—and across 11 geographies. They applied this algorithm against 1,300 brands, thus providing the basis for predicting winners and losers."
 

racked logo
Excerpt from Racked -- "Pure-play e-commerce can scale faster than brick-and-mortar, but then there’s a certain friction. The moment you are on Amazon’s radar, they will begin to look into your category. One of the most impactful ways to market a brand to somebody is to offer them a great in-store experience."

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Excerpt from NPR -- "[With cash] you see the amount. It's written on the bank note...in the absence of actually seeing that amount, you don't have a strong memory trace."

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Excerpt from The Guardian -- "High-end experiences, Alter points out, are increasingly devoid of choice: just as at the dawn of the automotive era, Henry Ford dictated that Americans could drive any color of black Model T, at the fanciest restaurants in New York, people pay extravagant sums to eat tasting menus dictated by top chefs. 'You want the producer to make some of these decisions for you,' Alter says. Luxury is found in limitations. 'There’s something comforting in knowing that for a very high-end product that it’s going to be curated for you by an expert,' Alter says. 'I would never let anyone curate a $5 meal for me.'"

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Excerpt from US News -- "Budgeting for the year is better largely because people feel less confident in monthly estimates, so they tend to add more of a buffer for unexpected expenses, according to research by University of Southern California’s Gulden Ulkumen, Cornell University's Manoj Thomas​ and New York University’s Vicki Morwitz​. The professors suggest taking a longer term view for a more accurate budget that you can stick with."

bbc news logo feature
 
Excerpt from BBC -- "People have been able to raise the amount that they wanted to raise, but they falter on the actual delivery. On issues like packaging, on issues like fulfilling the actual amount of orders."

new york magazine
Excerpt from New York Magazine -- "After analyzing the transactions, Karmarkar and Bollinger found small but statistically significant trends associated with bringing reusable bags. First, those with reusable bags were slightly more likely — 0.25 percent — to buy organic basics like milk and eggs. One green behavior may provide a gentle nudge into another, the researchers conclude. But those who brought their own bags were also slightly more likely — 1.24 percent — to buy indulgent (nonorganic) items, like potato chips and candy."

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "I know from running the entrepreneurship center at NYU, and we have 600 students through every year...Getting clarification on who's doing what in a team and getting it in writing is critical right from the starting point."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Heritage Italian brands Lamborghini and d’Avenza share a past that has remained exclusive to a select clientele,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D., founder of PIQLuxury and adjunct professor of luxury marketing at New York University, New York. 'Recently however, both brands have made a definite turn towards a wider market where they can promote products that are destined for a particular type of clientele, most probably of foreign origins.'"

quartz logo
Excerpt from Quartz -- "It is what’s called 'transactional utility' says Dr. Tom Meyvis, a professor of marketing at NYU’s Stern School of Business and an expert in consumer psychology. 'You see this a lot with clothing,' he tells Quartz. 'Part of the joy you get from shopping is not just that you bought something that you really like and you’re going to use, but also that you got a good deal.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "More and more, companies are making vending machines an important part of their product distribution strategies. Vending machines enable products to sell in more locations at a lower cost than in traditional retail shops since the real estate expense is usually lower, and other than restocking the machines, labor costs are non-existent. In most cases, there’s no competitive clutter around the machines and the products are the only ones in their category at that spot."

Womens Wear Daily
 
Excerpt from Women's Wear Daily -- "'Instagram is top of the funnel, brand-based marketing, and it’s very hard to establish direct attributes and that’s across all mediums. Whether it’s print or marketing, the ROI here [on Instagram] is largely secondary,' he said. Galloway added that since Instagram has an organic reach of 100 percent, it’s hard to over-invest on the platform right now."

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'It’s brain-dead to start making comments like this on behalf of a brand,' said Scott Galloway, a clinical professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'This isn’t shooting yourself in the foot, this is taking a machine gun and spraying bullets all over your feet.'"

usa today logo feature
 
Excerpt from USA Today -- "'The business says: Try this, it's a great product, it's free,' Galloway says. 'They make it as easy as possible for people to use the product, love it and hopefully can't go without it. Sampling or free has only grown in importance of marketing lexicon.'"

financial times logo feature
 
Excerpt from Financial Times -- "Anindya Ghose, professor of IT and marketing at New York University’s Stern School, says: 'When Apple makes such a big splash, whether it sells or not, it creates an awareness about a gadget of this kind.'"

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Excerpt from Fortune -- "They signal something about you. This is not a timepiece [holding up his watch]. I have not wound it in five years. It’s my vain attempt to express Italian masculinity and signal that if you mate with me I’m more likely to take care of your offspring than someone wearing a Swatch watch."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Having established its presence in the market for several years, Fragrance Du Bois is the ideal partner for Xerjoff that enters this market for the first time,' [Serdari] said. 'While Xerjoff is an Italian brand and Fragrance Du Bois is French, in other words both are European, Fragrance Du Bois provides a bridge between the East and West by allowing the locals to take pride in their homegrown natural resources, which are then converted into unique fragrances in the South of France, a region renowned for perfume making.'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think the consumer always wins, and the consumer wants a great multi-channel experience. They want products available online, they want the convenience and scale of online, but they also want to be able to go into these great flexible warehouses called stores, and stores are still a great shopping experience. When you look at the e-commerce companies that are really killing it, like Warby Parker, they've opened stores."

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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "At the DLD15 Conference in January, Scott Galloway, a marketing professor at New York University, said Apple shares many of the characteristics of a luxury brand, from high prices to its 'self-expressive benefit,' or the idea that owning Apple products can help make you more appealing to other people. This has allowed Apple to continue selling iPhones at higher margins even as pricing pressure has taken a toll on competitors’ profits."

new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'The thing that is scary about ISIS is that they have clearly taken content production to a level of quality beyond other terrorist groups,' [Galloway] said. 'The videos they have produced are the production quality of MTV.'"

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Excerpt from Business Insider -- "Galloway says he believes 'pure play' retailers that focus on either digital or brick-and-mortar sales cannot survive. He thinks e-commerce companies will be forced to open stores or 'go out of business' and that retailers need to be excellent at digital or they will 'go out of business.'"

Linkedin logo
 
Excerpt from LinkedIn -- "As malls crumble and Amazon ascends, Department Stores have been on deathwatch. Yet brick-and-mortar retail remains relevant. While growth in clicks outpaces bricks, 90% of retail sales take place in a physical store. Over the next five years, Department Stores will grow 22% globally, with most of the growth coming from emerging markets, specifically China. Department Store brands, including Nordstrom, are seeing big bets on digital begin to pay off, while brands like Sears and JCPenney are looking to digital as a lifeline."

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "When you're talking about economic growth, it is innovation that's the driver of that growth. So the way you increase growth, you have to have a vested increase in increasing the pace of innovation. And the way you increase the pace of innovation is increase the exchange of ideas - or between different industries. So, New York has a tremendous advantage because it's not just tech.... you know, fashion, media... it's all mixing of ideas."

luxury daily logo feature
Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'Not all brands need be patrons of the arts but luxury brands most often are,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D. brand strategist and adjunct professor of marketing at New York University, New York. 'Traditionally, luxury objects have been items of great craftsmanship and artistic intent, often made of the most precious and rare materials — in fact, most of the luxury objects produced in pre-modern times are housed in renowned museum collections today.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "The Harvard Business School Case, El Bulli: A Taste of Innovation, provides business lessons from the way Ferran Adria innovates (the Catalan chef, thought by many to be the most creative chef in history) and it truly changed my life. Ferran’s methods inspired both my book, Catalyzing Innovation and innovation program for global executives, Inventours™, and it made me far more observant of how others innovate across industries, wherever I go. Given how much I learned by studying Ferran, I thought learning how the best 'mixologists' innovate could yield similar insights, given the art and entertainment form inventive craft cocktails have become."

bloomberg logo new
 
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "It's a great time to be a writer, someone who's trying to greenlight a script. There's going to be more original scripted series this year than, I think, in the history of television. It's just not a great time to be in the business of selling eyeballs on an ad-supported model. HBO, great business. Netflix, great business. Amazon media might be a great business. Trying to get a ton of people to show up and then selling commercials to beer companies, that's going to be a difficult business."

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Excerpt from MediaPost -- "Craig and co-authors William Greene and Anthony Versaci (of AIG) analyzed 62 wide-release films over a six-month period. Among the top factors that led to increased online buzz were the film’s budget, its genre (horror and action do better than other genres) and whether the film is a sequel or not. 'This goes to show that studios do not have to remain passive bystanders, but can become actively involved in managing consumer engagement online,' Craig says. 'Similarly, studio executives can get an early read on its prospects.'"

bloomberg
 
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "New York Fashion Week didn’t used to be as public an affair. Traditionally, designers would show off their garb to buyers, who would write orders. 'Now it’s an opportunity for a brand to present their stuff in a controlled environment,' Scott Galloway, who teaches marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business, said on Bloomberg Television Tuesday. 'It’s all with the hope that well-heeled attendees will take a ton of pictures and spread it to a much broader audience.'"

bloomberg
 
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "Typically, bloggers bring a couple things. They bring an authenticity, a new voice and they usually bring a younger audience... No brand ever says, 'We have too many 18-30 year old fashionable thought leaders.' You never hear a brand say that, 'Oh, we need more 75 year olds.' You don't hear that a lot. So you [fashion blogger Danielle Bernstein] bring an audience, an authenticity, and also, you bring a business model. You're leaner and meaner."

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Excerpt from Entrepreneur -- "When discussing how weather affects human behavior in his book Drunk Tank Pink, New York University marketing and psychology professor Adam Alter said, 'Sunshine dulls the mind to risk and thoughtfulness.' Added Alter: 'Happiness sends a signal that everything is fine, the environment doesn't pose an imminent threat, and there’s no need to think deeply and carefully.'"

bon appetit logo
Excerpt from Bon Appetit -- "'The first impression I got seeing it was that I could taste it in my mouth,' says Priya Raghubir, professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'It pushed you to smell, taste, almost feel the ice cream, a sensual delight which people are reluctant to want to indulge in. This really appeals to all the hedonic senses, and there’s nothing to distract from the ice cream, and it doesn’t allow you to get bored or want to zap it. It’s excellent execution!'"

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "Well, they've got a clear value proposition, because they've said, you know, we are basically a membership-based online marketplace that's aimed at cost-conscious consumers that are willing to sacrifice speed of delivery for lower prices. It's a very clear... good marketing message. I think there's an exit strategy in play there somewhere. If you look at most start-ups and investors, they're looking for an exit within about a five year time frame, three to five years. This is what he did for Diapers with Amazon, so I think it's going to happen again either with an IPO or a strategic acquisition, which would be Amazon."

Linkedin logo
 
Excerpt from LinkedIn -- "Björk is no Britney Spears, no Rihanna, or Mariah Carey. Björk has built more than a mere brand. She’s built a #luxury brand and here is why."

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Excerpt from Inc. -- "'It is incredibly difficult to start to do things that are not within people's expectations because that brand promise comes with expectations,' says Carr. 'What is impressive about Swift is that ability to cross lines.'"

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'For a brand like Bottega Veneta, a brand of inconspicuous quality that relies heavily on the quality of materials, design and craftsmanship, building the microsite is a studied strategic initiative,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D. brand strategist and adjunct professor of marketing at New York University, New York. 'It allows the brand to tell the story of the product and treat it as an exceptional entity amongst its other offerings.'"

Newsweek Logo
Excerpt from Newsweek -- "Conducted by Jason Chan, assistant professor of information and decision sciences at the University of Minnesota and professor Anindya Ghose from NYU’s Stern School of Business, the study revealed a surprising increase in cases of HIV when a city adopted the intermediary service provider."


wall street journal logo feature
Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "'This is a judgment that you’d think that people would be motivated to get right,' said Justin Kruger, a social psychologist and professor in the marketing department at NYU’s Stern School of Business. 'There are all sorts of disincentives and punishments for being late, and the paradox is we’re late even when those punishments and consequences exist.'"

bloomberg logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "'I wouldn't even call this a failure. I'd call it an assisted suicide,' says Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at New York University's Stern Business School. 'It's amazing it's taken this long for this company to go out of business.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "The temptation in developing Super Bowl ads is to go part way: to create the ads that seem clever in some way, but not strategically sound or effective in achieving important brand objectives. Having been on both the client and agency side, I know first-hand that it can be a tricky balancing act managing the creative process between brands and agency creative teams. The challenge and management skill is to not ... stifle creativity, but also not to loose the incredibly valuable opportunity to increase positive brand understanding. In the end, advertising, no matter how subtle and two-way the communication, is about making more people want to buy, benefit from, or identify with brands."

chicago tribune
Excerpt from Chicago Tribune -- "Buying stuff to make ourselves feel better after a failure is not only expensive but could backfire and lead us to think more about our shortcomings, according to the study, 'Perils of Compensatory Consumption,' by Rucker, the Northwestern professor, Monika Lisjak of Erasmus University, Andrea Bonezzi of New York University and Soo Kim of Cornell University. Just as bad, retail therapy can strip consumers of mental resources and impair their self-control, the study says. And less self-control has been shown to potentially lead to excessive spending."

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "When a company messes up, three things need to happen, Galloway says. 'The first is to acknowledge the issue, to basically admit that you made a mistake,' he says. 'The second is to have the top guy or gal make that admission – so to get the CEO front and center. And the third is to overcorrect. To offer consumers a better deal than they originally had. Those are the only three things you need to remember, and they are consistently ignored.'"

paste magazine logo
Excerpt from Paste Magazine -- "Led by Vishal Singh of New York University’s Stern School of Business, the project examined consumer tastes across 416 counties in the United States, measuring 26 product categories ranging from frozen pizza preference to toothpaste. Over six years, Singh and his associates analyzed data and came find that a consumer’s political subconscious affects brands and items."

economist logo feature
 
Excerpt from The Economist -- "Drs Chan and Ghose looked at HIV rates in 33 states between 1999 and 2008, mostly in America's central regions (Craigslist's spread to populous cities along coastal regions was much faster, muddying the data there). The arrival of Craigslist, they found, was correlated with an average increase of 15.9% a year in the number of HIV infections compared with what would have been expected had it not been launched; the pair estimate that the listing website was associated with between 6,130 and 6,455 extra infections a year throughout the country."

wall street journal logo feature
Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "Researchers said they worked with Ashley Madison, a dating website for people seeking extramarital affairs, to analyze data on more than 8 million men who had registered with the site. The study was one of six published together in the journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' in 2014 that examined when people make big life changes. It found 950,000 men were ages 29, 39, 49 or 59, or '9-enders,' and their numbers on the dating site were 18% higher than what would be expected by chance, according to the researchers from New York University’s Stern School of Business and the Anderson School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles."

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "Sling TV, it's an opportunity to fill a void, so they're the first in, but it's low-hanging fruit. I mean, we've been waiting for this void to be filled forever. So somebody was going to do it. I think the thing that I'm missing here is they're still using an old concept from cable. They're still using a bundling concept... I think investors... should be looking for where the real innovation comes from when another provider, perhaps also Sling TV, starts to unbundle these things."

business standard logo feature
Excerpt from Business Standard -- "'Such a marketing gimmick is a kind of price obfuscation strategy. It is a baiting tactic to lure price-sensitive customers to their store in the hope of converting them. But such practices are counterproductive in the long run for retailers. They will never be able to establish a loyal customer base using such opaque pricing tactics,' said Anindya Ghose, professor of IT and marketing at New York University's Leonard Stern School of Business."

inc logo feature
Excerpt from Inc. -- "Anindya Ghose, an IT and marketing professor New York University's Stern School of Business, has spent much of the past few years studying mobile marketing, interactive retail beacons, and consumer privacy around the world. He says in Asia, where I reached him over telephone, beacons are increasingly popular in retail environments, and customers universally seem willing to give up a little bit of their data in exchange for the right rewards--say coupons or discounts. The primary hurdle to retailers using in-store mobile marketing is consumer awareness. But, Ghose says, 'given that a lot of consumers have the Shazam app, it is a brilliant play.'"

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Google wants BrandLab to help it diversify, and Galloway thinks it just might work. 'Advertising, even in a digital age, is largely relationship-driven,' he says, adding that BrandLab will help companies create better videos and stories, which might draw more eyes to YouTube. Galloway also thinks the more comfortable a company like Lancôme is with Google’s products, the more likely it might be to spend money on them down the road."

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "Anindya Ghose, a professor of IT and marketing at New York University’s business school, says that 'more than 53 percent of search is coming from smartphones, and a big, big part of the smartphone market is owned by Apple.' Ghose also has consulted for Apple and collaborated with Google and Microsoft."

daily mail logo feature
Excerpt from The Daily Mail -- "The researchers concluded: 'Consumption can sometimes compensate for our blunders and failures, but this doesn’t always work. Consumers who use products to boost their sense of self-worth tend to dwell on their shortcomings and their ability to exert self-control is impaired.'"

the guardian logo feature
Excerpt from The Guardian -- "Despite the massive, high-profile hacks of Sony, Target and Home Depot, new legislation will struggle to gain traction, said Anindya Ghose, professor of Information, Operations and Management Sciences at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'I don’t think anyone wants to see another Sony. It’s bad for everyone, but I find it difficult to see any legislation going through despite the importance of it,' said Ghose."

luxury daily logo feature
Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'The campaign has been timed well for Valentine’s day, fast approaching, making Intenso a top-of-mind product for women who are looking for something new for their men,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D. brand strategist and adjunct professor of marketing at New York University, New York."

bloomberg logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "It’s unlikely competitors will elbow out smaller manufacturers like Sierra Wireless, said Anindya Ghose, a professor at New York University who studies how the trend will affect businesses. Instead, smaller companies could become acquisition targets for technology giants looking to build out their presence in connected devices, Ghose said in an interview from New Delhi, declining to comment on whether Sierra would be a target."

atlantic logo feature
Excerpt from The Atlantic -- "In their paper, 'Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One's Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments,' professors Justin Kruger and David Dunning write that, 'People tend to hold an overly favorable view of their abilities in many social and intellectual domains.'"

economic times logo feature
Excerpt from Economic Times -- "'What they (Flipkart) need to focus on now is building an installed base of loyal users who will find the platform sticky enough and not go to competitors like Snapdeal or Amazon at the drop of a hat,' said Anindya Ghose, professor of IT and marketing at New York University's Leonard Stern School of Business."

economic times logo feature
Excerpt from Economic Times -- "'The big benefit (of having one dominant seller) is that it enables them to fund discounts and dictate pricing policies in a very clever way,' said Anindya Ghose, professor of IT and marketing at New York University's Leonard Stern School of Business. 'They (WS Retail and Cloudtail) can suggest the discount amounts to the sellers and in fact compensate the sellers for the actual discounts given, either directly (via debit notes) or indirectly (by waiving listing fees or commissions).'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "At the end of each semester, I ask my business school students to share what they think are the best new products or services of the year. Given how international, digitally savvy, and current the students are, it’s a great way for us all to learn about standout innovations. Here are 11 of my favorites across a range of industries, and why I believe they’re a win for both consumers and the idea originators."

daily mail logo feature
Excerpt from Daily Mail -- "People who are 29, 39, 49 or 59 are more likely to cheat and make life-changing decisions as they approach a milestone birthday, a study published in November revealed... Lead author Adam Alter, from New York University, said: ‘People audit the meaningfulness of their lives as they approach a new decade.'"

bloomberg logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think Coach is a fantastic brand, and it's been counted out and rumors of its death have been greatly exaggerated... Michael Kors and Kate Spade have sucked all the oxygen out of the room because they've done a great job, but look for Coach to come back. I like this acquisition... A lot of great specialty retail brands were built on the back of shoes. Jimmy Choo, Christian Louboutin. Kenneth Cole originally started out as a shoe guy. So they get great domain expertise here. It says it's an accretive acquisition. It sounds like a win."

economic times logo feature
Excerpt from Economic Times -- "As dean, Menon works with three core principles for the undergraduate college — academic excellence and innovation; glocal (global plus local) perspective, increasing opportunities for students to participate in the academic, cultural and professional communities of NYC; and a vibrant Stern community, working through students, alumni, parents, corporate partners and employers. Under her watch, applications to the undergraduate college have reached an all-time high."

cbs logo feature
Excerpt from CBS News -- "Raghubir cautions against falling for marketing tricks such as limiting quantities or availability of certain items in order to create a sense of urgency. 'Anything which crunches time or crunches the availability of a product is something that consumers then want to exert their independence on... and then,, oh, it's only available now. I better rush and get there before this deal is over,' says Raghubir."

The New York Times
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "Social targeting was supposed to replace demographic targeting, but that has not happened. Social media is just another media platform. It’s not re-shaping the business the way we thought it would."
 

wall street journal logo feature
Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "Working with University College London economist Áureo de Paula and New York University economist Vishal Singh, Mr. Hong used the Homescan data to examine another bubble, in rice. This started in late 2007 when India, worried about food security, banned rice exports. Fears of shortages emerged and panic buying ensued. The U.S. didn’t face a rice shortage, but prices still shot higher, and people started to hoard. Costco Wholesale and Sam’s Club even started rationing bulk purchases."

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "The Google/Luxottica partnership is a brilliant one. Google glasses speak to technology but not fashion and Luxottica’s brands speak to fashion and not tech. The partnership will result in attractive Google glasses that could be purchased based on looks alone, and the cutting edge technology can give Luxottica brands a reason for purchase that justifies a premium price. Luxottica’s glasses are increasingly being undercut on price by retailers such as Costco, TJ Maxx and Warby Parker."
 

psychology today logo feature
Excerpt from Psychology Today -- "Specifically, Adam Alter of the Stern School of Business at NYU and Hal Hershfield of the Anderson School of Management at UCLA conducted a series of studies to determine if approaching a new decade in age is associated with increased meaning-related appraisals and endeavors... In short, actually approaching a new decade in age or imagining approaching a new decade in age motivated a desire for meaning."

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'This is not inflation increases, this is something that is really extraordinary, and replicates the index of living extremely well,' says Thomai Serdari, a professor of  marketing at NYU’s Stern School of Business. She adds, 'it is a manufactured, namely, an artificial market that keeps going up, as long as there are people who are wiling to spend.'"

new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'Everything you buy, starting with your weekly groceries, will be flowing through one pipe called Amazon,' said Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'They’ll have your credit card purchase history, be able to do data-mining on your needs, offer massive selection with a reputation for low prices.'"

bloomberg logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think these defined moments of shopping are becoming less important and people are getting more confidence with the research that they do online that these products will be available for a while, so that the definitive 24-hour 'just-buy-now' is losing credibility, especially when you see Black Friday moving into Thanksgiving. So, I just don't think people are as worried they're going to miss out."

the guardian logo feature
Excerpt from The Guardian -- "And for the first time, thanks to new research by Alter and Hal Hershfield, an expert on the psychology of time at the University of California’s Anderson School of Management, we have a glimpse of just how profoundly we’re affected when we sense these milestones approaching and experience a 'crisis of meaning'."

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Excerpt from NBC News -- "'Consumers are cottoning on to these clever tactics and so over time they are less likely to be fooled,' said Priya Raghubir, the chair of the marketing department at New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business in New York City. 'And if they’re less likely to be fooled, the magic of Black Friday pretty much starts getting lost.'"

OZY logo
 
Excerpt from OZY -- "And even some concepts that have been percolating for some time now have proved to be a bust at some high-end boutiques. 'It’s been a little slow to catch on,' says Sam Craig, director of the Entertainment, Media & Technology program at NYU Stern School of Business."

FOX Business
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "We have to put [the expansion] in context. So, it's double their existing size and also it's one and a half times the size of Twitter. It also puts them at the same size as Salesforce.com, Delta Airlines, Kraft Foods. If we think about Hertz, it's been in the business forever. They're only about 11.3 billion. So, it's important to put it in context and say, what do they need it for? And they really need it for international expansion. So I think that's the interesting question. Why do they need to expand so quickly internationally?"

Wired
Excerpt from WIRED -- "'A lot of entrepreneurs are motivated to understand how to make their success repeatable,' says Prof. Williams. 'But what they have to recognize is there’s a lot of luck involved in entrepreneurship, and most entrepreneurs in the tech sector might only get lucky once.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "These formats tend to attract affluent shoppers who enjoy the in-store experience and finds, as well as cost-constrained consumers looking for great value. The appeal is multi-faceted."

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Excerpt from CNBC -- "'There's this myth that digital levels the playing field ... I don't think that could be more incorrect,' said Scott Galloway, founder of L2. 'A lot of these guys who are struggling to meet earnings just don't have the dry powder to throw at technology.'"

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Excerpt from Wallethub -- "Leave your credit card (and debit card) at home. Withdraw the cash you have budgeted to spend and pay cash for your purchases."

abc news logo feature
Excerpt from ABC News -- "'In general, it's easy to get caught up in big milestones, particularly as we age -- but of course there’s no real difference between turning 30 and turning 29 or 31,' [Alter] said. 'Our culture emphasizes years like 30, 40, 50, and 60, but we shouldn't let that shape how we live our lives.'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg Businessweek -- "Scott Galloway, founder of Red Envelope and a marketing professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business, said people generally aren’t in a shopping mood when clicking through a friend’s photos or reading Tweets (TWTR). 'So far, social and commerce are strange bedfellows,' he explained. That said, engagement rates on Instagram are 15 to 25 times higher than those on Facebook and Twitter, which makes the space particularly valuable for any company looking to make a connection."

new york magazine
Excerpt from New York Magazine -- "The years before beginning a brand-new decade — ages 29, 39, and so on — tend to be spent in self-reflection, according to a new paper published online today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. These are the prime What am I doing with my life? years, in other words, which prompts many people to behave in ways that suggest 'an ongoing or failed search for meaning,' the authors write. Their data suggests that these are the ages when people are more likely to either train harder for a marathon or run one for the first time; they’re also the ages when more people tend to cheat on their marriages or take their own lives."

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'Teaser marketing' has become the norm, Lieberman says. Those teases, trailers, viral marketing, piecemeal cast and crew announcements are coming earlier, thanks to the web and the crowded comic book movie market. 'They’re saying, "Look, don’t worry, don’t start shifting allegiances, because we’re coming with these movies every year for the next five-year period,"' Craig says."

OZY logo
 
Excerpt from OZY -- "Investors have to be accredited in the U.S., which generally limits the pool of possible investors to the top 1 percent. Now? About the top 5-10 percent of the population can buy their way in, estimates NYU’s Stern Business School professor Anindya Ghose."
 

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'There are a number of thing that’ll confuse people,' says Jack Jacoby, professor of marketing at NYU's Stern School of Business who says he is involved in 30 or 40 trademark disputes per year. In the case of Disney vs. Deadmau5,  Jacoby says the confusion case boils down to what’s in the mind of the person who picks a mau5head t-shirt off the rack-and whether they'll think the Deadmau5 item was made by, affiliated with or allowed by Disney. 'Disney’s saying "Wait, people may think that this comes from us,"' says Jacoby."

Womens Wear Daily
 
Excerpt from WWD -- "'They [Facebook, YouTube, Instagram] seem to be pulling away and starting to suck the oxygen out of the room for everyone else,' Scott Galloway, New York University marketing professor and cofounder of L2, told WWD. Twitter, which was among the top three platforms in last year’s study along with YouTube and Facebook, saw a complete flip, according to Galloway. He called it the 'most overvalued company' — surprised that despite being valued at $25 billion, more than Clorox, Coach and Abercrombie & Fitch combined, Twitter still has flat user growth."

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Excerpt from The American Bazaar -- "Recognition for Outstanding Contribution in Education – Dr. Geeta Menon: she is the 11th Dean of the Undergraduate College at NYU’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business and the Abraham Krasnoff Professor of Global Business and Professor of Marketing. She is a respected educator at the graduate and undergraduate levels, and has mentored many doctoral students who have gone on to become faculty members at top schools, including the University of Chicago, Cornell University and Dartmouth University."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'[This] campaign is not about engaging with consumers. It is about inspiring consumers, teasing them, making them get curious, igniting interest,' said Thomaï Serdari, Ph.D. brand strategist and adjunct professor of marketing at New York University, New York. 'After all, luxury, especially in such conceptual form and not as a product to be displayed and acquired, is a top-down reality.'"

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "My question is, what are you doing at the centralized account level above and beyond just listing all the stuff they've saved and they want to purchase? Are you helping them make better decisions? Are you adding value there?"

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Excerpt from The Baffler -- "Serdari suggests that it is actually the increasing popularity of lower- and mid-level bags that now drives up the cost of higher-level bags. And there’s still a market for them, even at a 150 percent mark-up. Serdari says that, just as existing brands are hiking up their costs to distinguish themselves from the rest, a newly reinvented fashion brand (like Céline) might today choose to produce bags with the most marked increase (at, say, $2,500—up from $1,000 ten years ago)."

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Excerpt from Al Jazeera -- "Apple's new system uses something called tokenization, which basically does not let the retailers get access to the credit card number and that's the premise on which Apple is basically pushing its system... that we will protect your data. To consumers, they're saying, we'll give you more convenience, we'll give you added security because of tokenization so that retailers don't know your credit card data. Now, for consumers, this is great. For retailers, this is not so good because, for years, they've always mined the credit card data to put in their offline and online transactions together and create a profile... they can use that to also target us with real-time advertisements when we're in the store. Now, with Apple Pay, they can't do that easily anymore."

The Wall Street Journal
Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "The nature of work itself is dramatically changing due to the concept of an ‘on-demand’ workforce. Studies have predicted that up to 40% of the U.S. workforce population will be part of this ‘on-demand’ labor pool (contractors, freelancers and temp workers) within the next six years. The primary motivation for companies to crowdsource, whether for labor, design, ideas or funding, is to reduce costs in a challenging economic environment, as well as to harness the skills, collective knowledge and wisdom of the crowds to complement the skills of their employees."

Womens Wear Daily
 
Excerpt from WWD -- "'It’s legitimate that customers have been very disappointed with large brands and their customer relationships. Someone has had to come in,' said Thomaï Serdari, brand strategist and adjunct professor of marketing at New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business. 'The customers felt quite alienated or disconnected and didn’t feel that brands spoke to them. That is what initiated this.'"

bloomberg logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "'This act by CVS and Rite Aid heralds the advent of the imminent battle in the mobile pay system,' Anindya Ghose, a marketing and information-technology professor at New York University, said yesterday in an e-mail."

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "For manufacturers, sample boxes away to give targeted consumers a taste, feel for, or experience with products they otherwise would probably not make the effort to get to know. There’s also far less competitive clutter in a sample box than visiting that product category section at retail, so the sampled brands have a much longer time for consumers to evaluate the selling messages on their packages. ROCKSBOX gives users who try the jewelry for a limited time, the option to purchase what they like for a reasonable price."

bloomberg businessweek logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg Businessweek -- "Apple also needs to sell consumers on Pay. Anindya Ghose, an IT and marketing professor at New York University, says the company should play up what he considers Apple Pay’s greatest strength: the added security of its token system. Right after Apple’s iPad introduction event on Oct. 16, Cook said the payment service’s security and privacy, combined with its ease of use, will appeal to consumers. 'It takes some time to roll out to banks and merchants, but I think there will be an incredible pull from customers who want it,' he said. 'At the end of the day, a merchant always does what their customers want.'"

fox business logo feature
Excerpt from Fox Business -- "The Apple brand has a lot of forgiveness. People are going to forgive them very quickly because they've got such a strong user base and it's an ecosystem that people feel locked into. I once heard it described as a prison you actually choose to go through because it's a closed system. So they're going to bounce back from this. Not a problem. I don't think it's going to have a real impact on the brand."

bloomberg logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "In 2010, de la Renta quietly sold an approximately 20 percent stake to GF Capital Management & Advisors to provide additional financing to launch a beauty business and open more stores. To leverage its brand, the company will need more capital, said Scott Galloway, who teaches marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business. He said the brand could be valued at as much as $1 billion if it can attract less well-heeled shoppers and said a strategic buyer or private equity firm might bite."
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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "The call is 'critical,' said Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'Is she going to have the wind at her back or in her face?'"

luxury daily logo feature
Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "'What is missing is cultural insight that needs to be internal,' Ms. Serdari said. 'To either partner with people who are bicultural–which is very different than bilingual, by the way–or to hire talent because even though it is expensive, [brands] will have much more return on their investment in the long term if [they] really have people who interpret who the local celebrity is, what TV show is watched, is there a Gossip Girl in Brazil, for example,' she said. '[Brands should ask], are we going to showcase our merchandise with that particular platform? Why or why not?'"

new york times logo feature
 
Excerpt from The New York Times -- "A handful of academic researchers have studied what goes on inside our heads when credit cards are in our wallets, and even people who do not carry a balance each month are prone to overspending for a variety of reasons. ... A study in 2008, titled 'Monopoly Money,' featured a gift card denominated in dollars. Even though the gift card lost value instantly when people used it, people were still more likely to spend freely with it than they did with cash."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "[Icahn is] a 78-year-old man worth $23 billion, whose favorite sport seems to be arguing with CEOs. 'Activism in general draws a person who does not shy away from the limelight or shy away from a fight,' says Scott Galloway, professor of marketing at NYU's Stern School of Business."  

fast company logo feature

Excerpt from Fast Co.Design -- "'If comprehending human communication consisted merely of translating sentences and syntax into thoughts and ideas, there would be no room for misunderstanding,' Kruger and company write. 'But it does not, and so there is... Email recipients only identified seriousness or sarcasm 56% of the time--not much better than chance.'"

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "How much of a price premium will consumers be willing to pay for the benefits, or will the customization be viewed as a competitive tactic to increase new customer acquisitions and brand loyalty, without a price premium? In the latter case, there is a calculable marketing replacement value to customization."

fox news
 
Excerpt from Fox News -- "Alvin Lieberman, a marketing professor at NYU and director of the school’s entertainment, media, and technology program, sees fierce competition for The Players’ Tribune. 'Jeter has to fight among the 200-plus cable channels and the many thousands of social networks,' he told FoxNews.com. 'Will he make an impression? Yes. The question is, how long will it last?'"

fox news
 
Excerpt from MyFoxNY -- "There's a lot of good that's come out of the 1999-2000 dot com bust. Ecommerce is what it is today because of what we have learned from the mistakes in the past. There is collateral damage. Sure, investors lost, but society benefited."

 

bloomberg logo feature
Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "[PayPal] has been the crown jewel. This is what CEOs like. They like to be diversified with a number of assets in case one property underperforms, but here's the deal. Investors don't need CEOs to diversify for them. They can diversify on their own. They need to be accountable for one business with one core mission and one core brand and let the best assets go out on the marketplace and get the shareholder return they deserve. The biggest winners here are Icahn because he's going to do a victory lap, and not only that, the people who work specifically on PayPal who will now get options on PayPal stock."

cnc world logo feature
Excerpt from CNC World -- "Tim Cook is gonna have a good legacy, I may even say great legacy. In the sense that a lot what we are seeing is still inventions during Steve Jobs' presence... technology takes a while for products to come out, so what we are seeing are possibly a lot of influences from Steve Jobs, but I wouldn't take credit away from someone like Tim Cook, I'm pretty positive that he will have an amazing legacy as well, especially with wearable technology."

marketplace radio logo feature
 
Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'Anything that starts to erode or challenge the 90-day window could be disaster for them,' says Sam Craig, director of the Entertainment, Media and Technology program at NYU. According to Craig, if just 10 percent of theatergoers stayed home, it would mean a loss of more than a billion dollars in ticket sales."

cbc logo feature
 
Excerpt from CBC Radio -- "It really comes down to the four entities of the marketing environment. One is the consumer and their shifting tastes and preferences towards healthier products. The other is the company and what makes sense for their marketing and production efficiencies. What the company's competitors are doing is something that is always on their radar. They don't want the competition to move too far ahead or beyond them. And then, finally, there's the public voice, or community, and the educational initiatives, efforts, and governmental policies and initiatives that have worked to educate the consumer on the importance of proper nutrition for adults and children."

business insider logo feature
 
Excerpt from Business Insider -- "...Galloway’s basic premise is this: Everyone thinks the 'digital age' is a rising tide that will lift all boats. But really, it’s a shift in tides that favors a few super yachts and will leave everyone else stuck in the sand or worse. With this perspective, he examines the players in three arenas: Social media, retail, and the world economy."

forbes logo feature
Excerpt from Forbes -- "Apple has become the ultimate symbol of luxury. And as the luxury sector has been the most robust part of the retail industry, particularly amid the nation’s vanishing middle class, the darling of the tech world is poised for explosion growth — particularly as it tip toes into upscale fashion accessories with its new smart watch, Scott Galloway, founder and chairman of L2 and clinical professor of marketing at NYU Stern, said during the conference. More than Cartier or Hermes, 'Apple is becoming the new indicator of wealth in our society,” said Galloway, who called Apple the hands-down winner today in the digital age."

pacific standard magazine logo
 
Excerpt from Pacific Standard Magazine -- "Imagine you’re working your way through a list of chores—you might have to dust some bookshelves, vacuum the rugs, and sweep the floors. Probably you’ll check off one group—one category—of chores at a time. If you dust one shelf, vacuum part of a rug, and sweep a bit over there, you’re still left with more dusting, more vacuuming, and more sweeping, making your to-do list feel interminable... That intuition turns out to be correct, according to Anuj Shah and Adam Alter. In a series of seven experiments, they show that the average person will try to tick off categories of unpleasant tasks before moving on to the next. They’ll do the opposite for more enjoyable things. That way, there are more categories left to sample from—even if the number of things in those categories is the same, that makes it feel like the good times last a little longer."

cctv logo
Excerpt from CCTV -- "China's ecosystem, regulation, and government favors local players, so to seriously expand into the Chinese market, you need a big brother and basically by taking money from Alibaba, you get a big brother on the ground in China."

wall street journal logo feature
Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "According to the study, commuters purchased 2.1% of the deals when the train was at two people per square meter, for example, versus 4.3% at five people per square meter. A stuffy train, the study concludes, can effectively send commuters into the hands of brands.'This was the mechanism to cope with the loss of personal space in a crowded situation,' said Anindya Ghose, co-director of Stern’s Center for Business Analytics and co-author of the paper. 'Commuters essentially escape from all of this by going to the personal mobile space.'"

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "'Gamification' uses characteristics like challenges, rewards, competitions, and moving to the next level based on performance skills or luck, in non-game contexts. It’s often accompanied by progress tracking metrics. The objectives are to engage users and change their behaviors in ways brands and organizations want. The extremely broad and expanding range of ways gamification has been successfully utilized in recent years provides insights into other ways the tactic can achieve strategic objectives."

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Excerpt from The Economist -- "Republicans and Democrats do have different shopping habits, observes Vishal Singh, an academic who studies marketing at NYU Stern. Republicans tend to drink more American beers; Democrats more foreign and craft brews. In Republican-voting districts Cracker Barrel, a southern-themed restaurant, is common; upscale Whole Foods shops cluster in Democratic areas. But this mostly reflects the different lives Democrats and Republicans lead. Southern food is popular, unsurprisingly, in the South, which is heavily Republican. Costly groceries are popular with affluent urbanites, who tend to be Democrats."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Does retail therapy remind people of their shortcomings, distract them from cognitive tasks and break down their self-control? The paper suggests that all of those things happen, unless someone tells the person that he made a smart choice in getting the product he hoped would make him more competent."

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Excerpt from NBC News -- "'Many people don’t want to feel like they have been left behind,' said Russ Winer, professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business. 'If you’re with out with someone and they pop out a flip phone, someone is bound to make a joke about it.'"

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Excerpt from Bloomberg Businessweek -- "Apple could foster the creation of such integrated ecosystems, by adding payment software and services to its tightly integrated family of products. By detecting an iPhone’s location, retailers could push coupons to customers as they shop, or even let people order food based on the show they are watching. 'It sounds like fiction, but it’s going to be fact,' said Anindya Ghose, a professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business."

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Excerpt from OZY -- "'The old conjecture — through the ’90s — was that Internet shopping would make everybody more price-sensitive,' explains Priya Raghubir, chair of the marketing department at NYU Stern School of Business. Which should get you a better price. But there’s a 'more recent phenomenon' at play here, she says: The consumer might be worse off. ... Company priorities are shifting, too, says Anindya Ghose, a marketing and IT professor at Stern. They once channeled much of their strategy budgets to advertising and marketing. Now they’re redirecting some of those millions to pricing strategy, a 'historically underinvested sector,' with investments in technology, data and analysis that help companies reach that sweet spot where you’ll still buy their stuff but they’ll make the most money."

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Excerpt from Pacific Standard -- "...Burtch and colleagues Anindya Ghose and Sunil Wattal went to 'one of the world’s largest online crowdfunding platforms,' as they describe it in their paper, and proposed a simple experiment... they found a privacy effect, meaning about five percent more people gave when they had to pay first and select privacy options later. But the authors also found what they termed a publicity effect: When users saw the privacy options last, those who went through with a contribution gave $5.81 less on average, the net result of fewer very large or very small (but still non-zero) amounts."

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Excerpt from Fox Business -- "The business implications are really exciting because what we've got here - let's get away from the specifics of the drone - what we've got here is Google X, and this is what I love about the Google X program - they're basically starting from a blank sheet of paper, they're disrupting the old infrastructure model...which is the airport, go to a depot, go to a truck model which was based on the railways, so they're starting from a blank sheet and saying if we came here today and we had to get stuff to people, how would we look at doing that. So it's a new infrastructure idea from the ground up and that's what's exciting."

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Excerpt from Bustle -- "Readers may be too immersed in a tragic story to consider its fictional nature … As a result, consumers’ emotional reactions to these experiences may be just as strong as their reactions to experiences that involve more proximal events (such as real-life stories)."

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Excerpt from VICE -- "According to the researchers, at issue is a preemptive 'priming' impulse in users that ultimately affects how much they donate. Presenting users with information controls before payment likely scared off some users not already aware of privacy issues on the web and encouraged users who were to donate more, knowing that the exact amount would remain hidden."

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Excerpt from Racked -- "[Serdari] noted that in recent years, Chanel has added a slew of new products that fall within the $600-$1000 price range. This is, of course, still expensive, but these purchases are considerably more affordable than a $5,000 purse. 'In order to maintain exclusivity and to keep increasing profit, they must increase the price of bags,' she explained."

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Excerpt from The Australian -- "While companies sell Fair Trade food, clothing and bedding products because they believe in being socially responsible, the goods can also be part of a marketing strategy, says Russell Winer, a marketing professor at New York University's Stern School of Business. Sixty per cent of shoppers are willing to pay the higher prices that Fair Trade items tend to have, according to a 2013 study he co-wrote."

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Excerpt from The Huffington Post -- "Just as companies have begun in recent years to monitor social media like Facebook and Twitter for feedback, the recent spate of high-profile recorded customer-service calls may push some companies to improve their customer service, according to Priya Raghubir, a professor of marketing at New York University's Stern School of Business. 'Just the mere fact that consumers could be doing this will get companies to start being a little more cognizant of trying to reduce the extent they try to hold customers hostage,' Raghubir told HuffPost."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think [Google's] ultimate goal, even if none of these great things - self-driving cars, or blimps that increase broadband - come to fruition ... as long as they maintain that status as the supreme source, the most trusted source of information in the world, they're going to do just fine without driverless cars or any other product. So the future looks pretty good for them other than the law of big numbers. It's hard to improve a 400 billion dollar market cap."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "I’ve been amazed each time I discover a new, innovative Microsoft Kinect application for Windows gesture, voice and movement sensing technology. The areas are as diverse as healthcare, education, retail and business-to-business product demos. What Microsoft has done with Xbox Kinect beyond video games highlights two important aspects of new product innovation I think more firms should engage in..."

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Excerpt from Reno Gazette Journal -- "Kruger and Dunning refer to their finding as the 'dual burden' of the unskilled: 'Not only do these people reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of the metacognitive ability to realize it.'"

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Excerpt from Fox Business -- "If you look at the opportunity [of Vurb], I think it's fantastic. They've innovated - it's a typical work-around because it's amazing that nobody else is looking at this situation. The reason for that, I think, is it wasn't a big enough problem to be really broken, it was just one of these...small frustrations that people got complacent about. The second thing was there's been a value shift in the markets so people are moving away from the web on to mobile so they're capitalizing on search for the mobile future. The third thing is they've really leveraged an ingrained behavior."

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Excerpt from BBC News -- "Sam Craig, professor of marketing and international business at New York University's Stern School of Business, agrees with Brompton's patient, long-term approach to the US market, saying that such a policy is vital if a foreign firm wants to gain a foothold. 'There is a big difference between selling products in the US and establishing a strong presence,' he says. 'Your product or service has to stand out, be distinctive, and offer superior value.'"

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Excerpt from CKGSB Knowledge -- "The rate of change in the world has been accelerating in terms of in developing economies, how easy it is to start a business, the rapidity with which commercial ventures are growing and changing, the recognition of really serious global problems that need more creative solutions to be solved, everything is moving more quickly and the standards are getting higher. So [there is a] much more competitive environment, much more rapidly moving environment, we need new ways to do things."

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Excerpt from Business Insider -- "In a New York University study, researchers found that people with easier-to-pronounce names often have higher-status positions at work. One of the psychologists, Adam Alter, explains to Wired, 'When we can process a piece of information more easily, when it's easier to comprehend, we come to like it more.' In a further study, Alter also found that companies with simpler names and ticker symbols performed better in the stock market."

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Excerpt from Today.com -- "'There’s a theory known as reciprocal disclosure, which suggests that friendships are built on a foundation of mutual disclosure. When you share a piece of personal information — a name, for example — you signal to other people that you’re willing to interact with them. In turn, they might open up to you, share a piece of personal information that further strengthens the relationship, and so on. So yes, wearing a nametag might encourage people to approach you — and, in time, it might become the first step in a budding relationship.'"

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Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "Alibaba's offer to crack down on gray-market goods for brands that open Tmall stores provides a powerful incentive for brands to join the site, said Scott Galloway, chief executive of L2 Inc., a New York-based research firm."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "'It’s definitely pay to play and they are definitely muscling brands and retailers around,' said Scott Galloway, a marketing professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business and co-founder of L2, a New York-based research firm that plans to publish its Amazon findings today with the title 'Great White Shark.'"

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Excerpt from BBC Radio -- "Corporate America has become rapacious and Levi's and the shareholders have always stayed true to their core about doing good so there's a ton of people that are rooting for them. That's why I still buy Levi's."

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Excerpt from Pacific Standard -- "'Although forecasters predicted less intense emotional reactions when reading about a distant (fictional) event than when reading about a proximal (real) event,' the researchers write, 'experiencers actually reported equally intense emotional reactions when they believed the story was fictional as when they believed it was real.'"

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'They’re basically in a monopoly selling position,' says Russell Winer, chair of the marketing department at NYU’s Stern School of Business. 'Since they don’t allow you, theoretically, to bring food into theaters, they can pretty much charge what they feel the market will bear.'"

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Excerpt from LinkedIn -- "Porsche, one of the most revered brands both because of its long history but also because of its achievements, has proved time and again that form stems from good design while it also expresses good design. Architect Mies van der Rohe’s dictum 'form follows function' has found its perfect manifestation in Porsche 911, a legendary car that has been in production since 1963 and has been evolving ever since."

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Excerpt from MarketWatch -- "'This new act would lead to greater price confusion and would be a big step backward,' [Morwitz] says. 'The most important piece of information consumers need to know is how much the air ticket will cost them in total and whether they can afford it,' Morwitz says. Airlines break down the total cost of the ticket during the booking process, she adds."

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Excerpt from Luxury Daily -- "When Chinese interact with Western retailers, they often complain about translation and shipping issues, miscalculation of prices and fees and inability to pay in RMB. Alipay, a product established in China and designed to respond to the demographic particularities of the Chinese consumer is positioning itself as the only product that can bridge East and West to make online shopping easy and enjoyable. Also, Alipay provides a new opportunity to Western retailers to increase their presence in the Chinese market without having to physically move there."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "Best-case corporate uses of Pinterst include a mix of company generated pins (some of prior blog posts), and curated customer generated content the company screens and chooses. Pinterest provides another way to deliver branded content that target customers will want to read, because it can help them in their jobs and personal lives, and is relevant and interesting."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "Will it work? Probably not. And the same reason why we don't buy products or shop online when we're in a bar, why you're not in a commerce orientation when you're on vogue.com... A lot of stores opened on Facebook in 2012 and the majority of them closed in 2013. We're just not in a buying mood when we're looking at our friends' kids' pictures... What it probably is is a trojan horse to get your credit card number. Because once you have someone's credit card number, you're much further down the funnel in terms of things you can offer them and make it very seamless and frictionless for them to buy something."

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Excerpt from Fox Business -- "'Consumers seem to prefer many small discounts to a few large ones and their perceptions of average prices do not drive their store choices,' the researchers wrote. 'One reason consumers find these retailers so attractive is that their product prices tend to be cheaper than those of their competitors on the majority of shopping trips.'"

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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "Russ Winer, a professor of marketing at the Stern School of Business at New York University, said the campaign was 'an important thing for Ryder to do' for businesspeople who have misperceptions about its current strategy."

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Excerpt from Associated Press -- "While companies sell Fair Trade food, clothing and bedding products because they believe in being socially responsible, the goods can also be part of a marketing strategy, says Russell Winer, a marketing professor at New York University's Stern School of Business. Sixty percent of shoppers are willing to pay the higher prices that Fair Trade items tend to have, according to a 2013 study he co-wrote."

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In a new study, NYU Stern Professor Vicki Morwitz and her co-authors, Shai Danziger of Tel Aviv University and Liat Hadar of the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, find that consumers who try to maximize savings will choose retailers that they believe offer lower prices more often.

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Excerpt from E-Commerce Times -- "Since secrecy is such an integral component, it seems a little surprising that Secret would want to add Facebook integration, said Anindya Ghose, professor of IT and marketing at New York University and co-director of the Center for Business Analytics at NYU Stern. ... 'At first glance, it seems counterintuitive to me. The foundation of Secret is based on preserving anonymity. A potential integration with Facebook can jeopardize the comfort feeling that current users have with this app,' Ghose suggested."

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Excerpt from TIME -- “'Here you can evaluate the quality of output over time and then decide whether you want to continue subscribing or not,' says Anindya Ghose, a professor of information, operation and management sciences at New York University who also studies crowdfunding. 'It’s a very positive self-reinforcing cycle where people give small amounts of money, which incentivizes artists to do a better job, which then leads people to give more money more frequently.'"

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Excerpt from Financial Review -- "'It’s a rebirth of the notion that bigger is better,' says C. Samuel Craig, director of New York University’s Stern School of ­Business entertainment, media and tech­nology program."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "IBM is a huge company, and right now, if you're not Google or Apple, it sucks to be a big company in tech. Anyone associated with the desktop era of the 80s and 90s is suffering, whether it's HP or IBM... IBM is better suited than those guys because they have a really robust services division."

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Excerpt from MarketWatch -- "More movies, television shows and live sporting events being produced by one company means less competition and more seller power, says Samuel Craig, director of the Entertainment, Media and Technology Program at New York University’s Stern School of Business. 'Consumers may see a slight increase in their cable bill to see the content they want,' he says. As media reports of the bid have suggested, it’s unlikely that the Federal Communications Commission would allow one company to own both CNN and Fox News, he adds."

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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "I think a lot of it's semantics. I think wearables is going to be huge, but I think this [the smartphone] is going to be your wearable. I think that you're going to get a lot of health devices and a lot of tracking on here... I'd put this right up there with mass customization and 3D printing as some of the things the media seems to be much more excited about... the performance is not living up to the promise yet."

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Excerpt from Environment & Energy Publishing -- "'The idea is to remind the consumer or educating about this industry's positive spillover effects on the society, like job creation, clean energy, etc.,' Erdem said. The education effort can't hurt if industry investments 'may result in even higher electricity charges. ... They don't want a backlash from the consumers so they want to prepare the ground for that.'"

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Excerpt from The Huffington Post -- "Political ideology plays a role in shopping behavior, according to Vishal Singh, a marketing professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business who has studied the topic. Singh’s research shows that conservatives are more likely to pick more established name brands over generics and are slower to adopt new products. They also tend to favor domestic over foreign beers. These trends are consistent with attitudes associated with conservatism, such as being skeptical of new experiences, Singh said."

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Excerpt from Marketplace -- "In order to draw people to the site, Yahoo needs strong, unique content – different from what Netflix or Hulu is offering, says Sam Craig, a professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business. 'It’s a crowded marketplace out there and unless you have something with an identity, people aren’t going to come to it,' he explains."

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Excerpt from Cosmopolitan -- "Economists call it the denomination effect: When you have small bills, you're more apt to spend them on little stuff. On the other hand, you wouldn't break a $50 or a $100 bill to buy a pack of gum or a soda."

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Excerpt from Forbes -- "One of the very best forms of stimuli comes from looking at other industries for ideas, relevant analogies, and problem solving. The trickiest part is to figure out which industries to benchmark. That, in itself, requires brainstorming sessions."

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Excerpt from Scientific American -- "That music can move us is no surprise; it’s the point of the art form, after all. What’s new here is the manner in which the researchers have quantified in fine-grained detail the cognitive ramifications of unpacked melodic compounds. This investigation of music’s building blocks may be more relevant than you suppose. Nowadays, experts in the production room can hone a track—the timbre, tone, rhythm, phrasing—with digital precision. These songwriters and producers are the true geniuses behind the success of popular music today, and they seem to have an intuitive grasp of the phenomena underlying the findings of this psychology article. An extra breath-sound here, a pitch adjustment there—these additives pepper the songs we hear on the radio. So the next time you hear a piece of music from the Billboard Top 40, it may be interesting to wonder, how many components were manipulated just so, in order to change the way I think?"

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Excerpt from The Huffington Post -- "'There are emotional reasons for why [customers] are loyal, in spite of new information that there might be safety issues,' Erdem said. 'For example, these people may have memories of GM cars. They may remember things growing up with their families in a GM car... It's not rational,' Erdem said."

new york magazine
Excerpt from New York Magazine -- "As Adam Alter, a psychologist at NYU who has studied name effects, explained in an email, 'When people aren’t sure what the candidates believe, they’re often swayed by irrelevant information, like the candidates’ names.'"

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Excerpt from Crain's New York Business -- "'Small businesses are struggling with lower demand and the expectation of greater value while their rent and other costs aren't going down proportionally,' said Jeffrey Carr, clinical professor of marketing and entrepreneurship at New York University Stern School of Business."


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Excerpt from Fox Business -- "I think it's less about Uber and it's about the sharing economy. This is the biggest thing that investors have been excited about in a long time. The reason why? The sharing economy - it's not just an economic revolution, it's a behavioral revolution. These companies like Uber are shaping and changing behavior."


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Excerpt from Fox Business -- "You've got to be about sales and distribution at this point. You've got the platform, it's all about making that pitch pitch-perfect for the venues - what are the advantages in making the change because they're steeped in inertia, these whole point-of-sale systems. That's going to be the big challenge for you guys."


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Excerpt from Financial Times -- "Scott Galloway, clinical professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business and founder of L2, a think-tank for digital innovation, advises: 'The best collaborations let bloggers do what they do best: curate content that resonates with their established audience. Discerning readers will quickly detect when a blogger has gone corporate.'"


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Excerpt from MBAPrograms.org -- "The takeaways are learning what measurements from social media to use, and seeing the relationship between the actions you take on this platform and their results. 'The causal relationship is more useful and reliable than mere prediction,' says Ghose. All this, he adds, can improve one's management skills because they teach you how to use data to drive decisions."


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Excerpt from Ecommerce Times -- "'In the case of Zappos, because it is about prospective job candidates, people are going to be very measured and selective about what they say and do on these internal forums,' Ghose told the E-Commerce Times. 'They would want to give the best possible impression to prospective recruiters, and so their content will be very carefully curated.'"


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Excerpt from The Globe and Mail -- "In the retail sector, Mr. Galloway argued that Amazon.com Inc. is a big winner at the expense of brands that have weak digital strategies, such as Target. He offered what might be the best metaphor I’ve ever heard to explain what Amazon is doing by building gigantic fulfilment centres outside of urban areas. He suggests that while the cable company is your conduit for digital bits (think cable modem service), Amazon’s fulfilment business is set to become your conduit for atoms (physical stuff). Because Amazon spends so much money on technology and fulfilment, Mr. Galloway says it’s like they’ve gone underwater with a huge oxygen tank and forced their competitors, who have much smaller oxygen tanks, to dive down too. He calmly predicts that the weaker players will run out of air and drown."


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Excerpt from AdAge -- "But releasing an app pits brands against the commandeering forces of social media and games. 'Unless you have something that's an incredible application in terms of utility, it's just a tree falling in the forest,' said Scott Galloway, a marketing professor at NYU. 'No one hears it.'"


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Excerpt from Yahoo! Finance -- "In the second stage of the research, New York University’s Dr Adam Alter studied 500 first and last names of US lawyers. He found that those with the most pronounceable names were promoted faster than their unusually named counterparts, even though they had comparable skills and experience."


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Excerpt from Fashionista -- "'We have seen a great decline in brand presence on Tumblr, which is a negative forward looking indicator for the platform,' Scott Galloway, founder of digital luxury consultancy L2, says."


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Excerpt from BedTimes Magazine -- “'Any organization that’s only embracing incremental change is in a dangerous position,' said Williams. 'That path is getting narrower and narrower, until at the end, the customer has forsaken you for someone else that you didn’t even see coming.'”


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Excerpt from Fox Business -- "I think it's actually a perfect fit. I see complete synergy between the brands because, when you think about it, the actual guy who designed the headphones used to be the head of design at Apple... People have to stop thinking about Apple as a technology company now and start thinking of them as a fashion and a lifestyle brand... They're also the disruptors... they wouldn't go and acquire someone who's just copied them. And if you look at what Beats did, they're the complete opposite to Apple. So Apple's coming out with these little light headphones, they came out with these big heavy bass headphones. Apple was coming out with something very subtle you hardly see, they were coming out with something very obvious."


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Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'To position it as a status symbol, as something you buy to impress other people, doesn’t make sense,' [Meyvis] said. 'Other people don’t see it. You don’t talk about it. It makes more sense for mattress advertising to take a functional approach that provides a solution to a problem,' as the ComforPedic iQ campaign does, he said."


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Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "The percentage of the traffic you get from Facebook to a retailer does not convert at a high rate. The traffic is what we could call low-grade traffic. Whereas, the traffic coming off of Instagram tends to convert at a high rate and have a higher average order value when people do buy."


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Excerpt from CKGSB Knowledge -- "We can quantify the dollar value of innovation. And I think that’s one of the major issues that many managers face. They have to find out whether they should to put more money into the R&D or stop it. That’s a major decision and that depends on expected value of that innovation which we can quantify."


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Excerpt from Forbes -- "From little butter almond flavored pastries that come free with each coffee at Financier shops in New York City, to free hemming of pants over $29.95 at Uniqlo, to free Cosmos served at Dashing Diva nail salons in New York City, customer touchpoints can be powerful differentiators vs. competitors and can also generate significant buzz and earned media!"


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Excerpt from Smart Company Australia -- "Drawing on a number of studies, Alter put forward the case that bursts of ‘artificial complexity’ can shake people out of their stupor. In a sense, the occasional wave in otherwise flat surf can force us to concentrate a little harder."


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Excerpt from Financial Times -- “'These companies are hot on the heels of Instagram, and keen for first-mover advantage in the nascent field of visual social commerce,' says Scott Galloway, founder of L2. 'Regardless, Instagram remains head and shoulders above the competition. In under two years, it has become the most powerful social media platform for visual-based branding in the world,' he said."


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Excerpt from Fox Business -- "I'd want to see the results of some small-scale experiments. I think it's great you've got these pilots lined up, but I think they're going to be really important. You've got to ask what resources do you need to complete these pilots, what questions do you need answered, and how do you measure the success of these mini-pilots, because that's going to dictate how you scale this up."


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Excerpt from USA Today -- "With the inundation of online ads, marketers are realizing that their standard ways of advertising are not always effective, said Anindya Ghose, marketing professor at NYU's Stern School of Business. 'I think we will see more of these novel, interactive ads in the next few years,' Ghose said."


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Excerpt from Re/code -- “You either pay to play or you go out of business. … It’s slowly sucking the air out of all the other big e-commerce players.”