NYU Stern

Upcoming Conferences

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
"Political Economy, Public Policy, and Financial Markets"

November 13-14, 2015

The Carnegie-Rochester-NYU Conference on Public Policy is now soliciting papers for a conference on “Political Economy, Public Policy, and Financial Markets." This Conference will be held at Carnegie Mellon University on November 13-14, 2015. The papers and comments are intended for publication in the July 2016 issue of the Journal of Monetary Economics.

The editors invite detailed abstracts of no more than two pages describing the proposed research paper. (If a preliminary version of the paper is available, authors may include it with their abstract.) Proposals should be submitted electronically to Sue North, Editorial Assistant for the Journal of Monetary Economics, no later than April 13, 2015. 

Financial markets have long been shaped by legislative and regulatory public policy. Government sets standards and rules in financial markets through a variety of specialized agencies. Broad macroeconomic and tax policies impact aggregate outcomes and financial markets; accounting and disclosure standards also impact aggregate and financial market outcomes. Whether or not these standards, rules and policies work as intended, they are determined by political processes so politics influences outcomes in financial markets and vice-versa. 

We invite proposals that use theoretical models and empirical or narrative methods to identify and explore the interplay between political economy, public policy, and financial markets. We hope to bring together researchers from financial economics, macroeconomics, public economics, and political economy to address the intended and unintended consequences of actual or potential political decisions for financial markets and to propose alternative policies where needed.

The following topics are among those of interest: 1) the relationship between political uncertainty and asset prices, 2) the feedback from financial market outcomes to electoral and political processes, 3) the impact of politics on financial market regulation, 4) the impact of tax policies on domestic and international financial markets and the feedback from these markets on U.S. tax policies, 5) the impact of accounting and disclosure standards on domestic and international financial markets and the feedback from these markets on accounting and disclosure standards, 6) the unintended consequences of financial regulation, 7) the politics of macro-prudential policy, and 8) the implications of the interplay between financial markets and political processes for independent government agencies and their relationship to other branches of government and to industry.

The editors, in collaboration with the Carnegie-Rochester-NYU Advisory Board, will make the final selection of papers to be included in the Conference. Authors will be notified by May 1, 2015 if their paper has been selected. Authors will receive an honorarium of $2500 and be expected to present their paper at the Conference. The papers should represent original research not presented or published elsewhere. Since the papers are intended for publication, authors will not be able to publish or reprint the work elsewhere without the permission of the editors and publisher.  Please note that the editors will contact authors only if their paper is accepted.

 
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
"Globalization since the Crisis"

April 8-9, 2016

 
The Carnegie-Rochester-NYU Conference on Public Policy is now soliciting papers for a conference on “Globalization in the Aftermath of thesince the Crisis.” The conference will be held at the University of Rochester on April 8-9, 2016. The papers and comments are slated for publication in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Monetary Economics.
 
The editors invite detailed abstracts of no more than two pages describing the proposed research paper. (If a preliminary version of the paper is available, authors may include it with their abstract.) Proposals should be submitted electronically to Sue North, Editorial Assistant for the Journal of Monetary Economics, at north@simon.rochester.edu, no later than Monday November , 2, 2015.

Starting in the middle of the last century, declining policy barriers, falling transportation costs, and improved communication have driven a swift rise in world exports, foreign investment, and cross-border asset trade, far outpacing the growth in world output. This trend of increased integration was interrupted by the global financial crisis. Since the crisis, growth in world trade has fallen off and the financial flows have diminished. The lead up to the Great Recession was a period of growing financial and goods market integration. Since the crisis integration has lagged.  Proposed trade agreements have stalled. Capital flows have diminished as some countries have placed restrictions on capital flows. Tensions in the eurozone have deterred progress toward fully integrated goods and factor markets, if not the existence of the EU itself. Efforts to rein in the potential excesses of financial markets and “ringfence” risks within national regulatory boundaries have resulted in the fragmentation of credit markets and widening interest rate differentials across countries. Monetary and fiscal policy in the US, Europe, and Japan have raised concerns in the rest of the world.  
 
This conference seeks proposals for theoretical, empirical, or quantitative papers thatto examine the evolving role of real and financial linkages in the global economy and the associated costs and benefits of globalizationintegration since the crisis. Possible tTopics might include but are not limited tonvolve: 1) identifying and measuring changes in the pace of financial and trade real integration, 2) evaluating the contribution ofrelationship between market integration, business cycles and to growth in the lead up to and followingsince the crisis, 3) the political economy of integration, regulatory supervision and the cycle, 4) cooperation and competition in fiscal and monetary policy and supervision, 5) the regulation of financial firms activities/portfolios in a global economy, and 6) taxation of multinational activities .and 6) an assessment of the benefits of global integration in light of the risks revealed by the financial crisis.
 
The editors, in collaboration with the Carnegie-Rochester Advisory Board, will make the final selection of papers to be included in the Conference. Authors will be notified by November 20, 2015 if their paper has been selected. Authors will receive an honorarium of $2500 and be expected to present their paper at the Conference. The papers should represent original research not published elsewhere. Since the papers are intended for publication, authors will not be able to publish or reprint the work elsewhere without the permission of the editors and publisher. Please note that the editors will contact authors only if their paper is accepted.