• Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "Many times over the last three decades, the challenges of the Department of Justice were very mild in a sense that it would allow the mergers to go through with various behavioral restrictions, or conduct restrictions that the companies had to follow after the merger. Why the Department of Justice is concerned, and I think it's a legitimate concern, is there was never a follow-up, so the company said, 'We are going to do all these things,' and the merger went through and they didn't really do these things. ...I think both sides have a hard task in front of them and that is why this trial is interesting and why the outcome is uncertain."
  • Excerpt from Barron's -- "On Wednesday, Zuckerberg managed to sound contrite and give the impression that they are taking action. But he showed up with a squirt gun at a fire he started. What they should be doing is over-correcting. When Tylenol was a victim of tampering in the 1980s, Johnson & Johnson pulled bottles of it from every drugstore, supermarket, and bodega in the country."
  • Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "Author and professor Adam Alter compares these new technologies and smart devices to slot machines and other addictive substances in terms of their impact on our minds and physical well-being — as well as on our inability to turn away."
  • Excerpt from The New York Times -- "But now that round-the-clock communications are ingrained in the way we work, some businesses might view cutting out these communications as shortening the workday, and hurting their bottom line, said Sonia Marciano, a professor of management and organizations at New York University’s Stern School of Business. The best solution to fatigue from after-work work, she said, was an honest conversation about expectations between employer and employee. Unfortunately, she said, 'those conversations rarely happen.'"
  • Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "...Today we are in the age of artificial intelligence, in the age when the consequences of having technology not working the way that it should can be life threatening and so I'm hoping that what this causes is a close look at the philosophy surrounding technology regulations and technology testing and perhaps taking a book from the biological sciences and medicine where things are tested and perfected and then people wait for a few years to better understand any unintended consequences before the product is finally rolled out to the public."
  • Excerpt from Nightly Business Report -- "I think the recognition that there's obviously been this, as Ms. Sandberg said, breach of trust and the implications that the government and policy makers may want to weigh in on that and the implications of that. I think this becomes a real question: can Facebook help to... co-create the regulations that might be put in place that would govern some degree of control over both advertising and the management of social media online? To me the real question is how deep those regulations would actually go if they were to be put in place and how enforceable they would be..."
  • Excerpt from Vox -- "New York University researchers Germán Gutiérrez and Thomas Philippon in a recent working paper for the National Bureau of Economic Research examined possible reasons for lower-than-expected corporate investments in the United States since the early 2000s. They determined decreased competition, tightened corporate governance, and short-term pressures are in play."
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    Excerpt from The Insurance and Investment Journal -- "The world has had a series of financial crises since the Mississippi Bubble, a financial scheme in the early 1700s in France that triggered a speculative frenzy and ended in financial ruin, said Sylla. And there will inevitably be more, he said, as memories of crises past fade, those crying wolf on new worries are 'shooed away' and people in general believe that 'this time will be different.'"
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    Excerpt from Finder -- "Co-Opetition by Brandenburger and Nalebuff. Typically, we think of the business world as cutthroat – compete at all costs and destroy your competition. This book, using game theory principals, challenges this notion and urges you to expand your horizons. There are many instances where a win-win perspective is far superior to a win-loss perspective."
  • Excerpt from Fox News -- "Robert Seamans, an associate professor of Management and Organizations at New York University said there may be a good reason why Zuckerberg and Sandberg have yet to comment, noting they might be trying to still collect all of the information needed rather than 'say something quickly for the sake of saying something.'"
  • Excerpt from the Hindustan Times -- "Indian consumers are unique because they represent a combination of cultural values that are shaped both by their heritage as well as Western influence over the last 150 years. They express these values in consumption and demand product offerings that are more tailored to their tastes rather than standardized Western products."
  • Excerpt from The New York Times -- "'It’s following the leader — the N.F.L.,' said Allen Adamson, a branding expert and an adjunct professor at N.Y.U. 'It’s good for the Yankees, it’s good for Boston, and an attempt to inject some topspin into the sport, but I don’t think it mitigates the need to revitalize baseball in the United States.'"
  • Excerpt from Vox -- "'They should know who’s paying them,' said Vasant Dhar, a professor of information systems at New York University, 'because the consequences are very serious.'"
  • Excerpt from Bloomberg View -- "Fund size, the authors found, is related to pay, but the relationship is again weaker than one might think -- on average, only about 15 percent of the fee revenue a fund gets from managing more assets gets passed through to the manager. And the relationship is even weaker for larger funds. Most of those enormous management fees are captured by mutual-fund companies, not by the people managing the funds."
  • Excerpt from Marketplace -- "'It is headed by the Treasury, to which all of these other bodies report,' explained Roy Smith, an emeritus professor of finance at New York University. The move 'essentially brought to an end the problem of regulatory silos not coordinating with one another,' he said."
  • Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "'We’re within the phase of autonomous vehicles where we’re still learning how good they are. Whenever you release a new technology there’s a whole bunch of unanticipated situations,' said Arun Sundararajan, a professor at New York University’s business school. 'Despite the fact that humans are also prone to error, we have as a society many decades of understanding of those errors.'"
  • Excerpt from Quartz -- "In 1999, together with social psychologist Justin Kruger, Dunning identified the co-eponymous Dunning-Kruger effect: people who are incompetent and lack knowledge in a field tend to massively overestimate their abilities because, quite simply, they don’t know enough to recognize what they don’t know. So hugely unqualified people erroneously believe that they’re perfectly qualified."
  • Excerpt from CNBC -- "'Bitcoin has taken over the public imagination,' Damodaran said. 'But it's a very small phenomenon.' He pointed out that the market capitalization of all cryptocurrencies (below $400 billion) is less than half the market cap of one company: Apple, which has a market capitalization of more than $900 billion."
  • Excerpt from Bloomberg -- "It looks like with a company like Walmart that has such a solid reputation for reporting and corporate governance, it does look like a disgruntled employee. What is interesting here is that the market is always in a hurry to discount anyone's efforts to combat or push back against Amazon. The marketplace is very receptive to any story that is negative about anyone going up against Amazon."
  • Excerpt from Barron's -- "This year especially, the connective tissue between disparate trends — artificial intelligence, genetic editing, autonomous travel, collaborative robotics and cryptocurrencies — is especially strong."
     
  • Excerpt from The Washington Post -- "The antitrust debate is giving pause to business leaders nationwide, analysts say, particularly in the health-care sector, where a bevy of recent cross-industry deals could raise similar regulatory issues. CVS’s $69 billion acquisition of the health insurer Aetna, as well as Cigna’s $52 billion purchase of Express Scripts, could both be affected by the AT&T trial, analysts say. 'If the government wins this case, they would be concerned,' said Nicholas Economides, an economics professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business."
  • Excerpt from the Harvard Business Review -- "According to researchers Beth Bechky and Gerardo Okhuysen, one critical factor that enables these teams to handle surprises is that members are familiar with everyone else’s work and understand how their various tasks fit together."
  • Excerpt from CNNMoney -- "Nostalgia can be a powerful marketing tool, but it's not always enough, said Tülin Erdem, chair of NYU Stern's Marketing Department. 'You can have a comeback with [nostalgia], but you can't sustain it,' she said."
  • Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal -- "Some investors are watching indicators of credit strength that are generally regarded as a gauge of a company’s likelihood of bankruptcy, such as the 'Altman Z-Score,' which was developed by a New York University professor, Edward Altman in the late 1960s."
  • Excerpt from The Economist -- "Pankaj Ghemawat, of New York University, says there is some truth in this. All else equal, a common language boosts trade to 2.2 times what it would be without a common language, and colonial links can boost it to 2.5 times."