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Course & Class Planning

These links take an instructor through the process of thinking generally about a new course, creating a syllabus, and creating each class session. Caroline Bartel's link contains useful advice about getting off to a good start with a new class. Carroll's article reminds instructors that they have some control over their students' responses to them.


 

Course Planning

Creating a Syllabus
Barbara Gross Davis (1993) Tools for Teaching
Covers the basics that should be included in a syllabus.

Planning a Class Session – Online Tutorial
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Pennsylvania State University
A step-by-step series of ideas and questions to think through class design. Excellent for new instructors and for instructors who want to rethink a course.

Strategies for Promoting Positive EngagementPdf Icon
Prof. Caroline Bartel, NYU Stern (2003)
Caroline Bartel's (Management) Teaching Suggestions for New Faculty 

First Day of Class

These articles are sufficiently different from each other that we recommend skimming each of them if you are a new instructor. Different approaches will appeal to different instructors, and you will benefit from the ideas of each author.
 
First Day of Class
Barbara Gross Davis (1993) Tools for Teaching
Covers the major points to discuss on the first day.
 
Preparing for the First Day of Class
Center for the Instructional Development and Research, University of Washington
What to think about as you plan for the first day of class.
 
Strategies for Learning Names
Teaching Resource Center, Indiana University
National Teaching and Learning Forum reprint

Discusses several strategies for learning students' names.
 
How to Have a Relationship with a Large ClassPdf Icon
Faculty Forum workshop, February 25, 2003
Facilitated by Stephanie Nickerson

When planning courses and specific classes, it is important to take into account all one’s students. The tendency is to create a positive learning climate for students most like oneself, thus, privileging them. These articles suggest ways to create welcoming classroom settings for all students.


Occasional Papers: CRLT Multicultural Teaching
University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning & Teaching
Articles addressing inclusive teaching, teaching students with disabilities, student learning styles and their implications for teaching, perceptions of faculty behavior by students of color. 

Strategies for Inclusive Teaching
Vanderbilt University
Links from several university teaching centers.

Fostering Diversity in a Medium-Sized Classroom
Brenda J. Allen, University of Colorado, Boulder
Sensible strategies for classes larger than 40.

Diversity/Inclusive Teaching Tips
School of Education, Indiana University
Many ideas to help instructors create a positive learning climate. 

Universally Designed Instruction
Raymond Orkwis, ERIC Digest, 2003
Summarizes the components of universal design for learning, “design of instructional materials and methods that makes learning goals achievable by individuals with wide differences in their abilities. 

Large Classes

These links suggest good ways to approach large classes, which, to teach well, require more energy, organization, and creativity than small classes. Several links describe ideas for incorporating computer technology to increase learning in large classes and for effective management. Although some of the links purport to apply to classes of 500 or even larger, the lessons are appropriate for smaller classes of 70 to 100 as well. The two faculty forums How to Have a Relationship with a Large Class and Relating to Large Classes are Stern focused.

Preparing to Teach the Large Lecture Class
Barbara Gross Davis (1993). Tools for Teaching 
Discusses strategies for structuring lectures in large courses.

Beating the Numbers Game: Effective Teaching in Large Classes
Richard M. Felder (1997)
A practical how-to for using active learning and effective management in very large classes. 

How to Have a Relationship with a Large ClassPdf Icon
Faculty Forum workshop, February 25, 2003
Facilitated by Stephanie Nickerson 

Relating to Large ClassesPdf Icon
Faculty Forum workshop, June 11, 2003
Facilitated by Stephanie Nickerson 

Alternative Teaching/Learning MethodsPdf Icon
Faculty Forum workshop, April 2, 2003 (updated April 2004)
Facilitated by Stephanie Nickerson
Included are small group learning, ungraded quizzes, student presentations and others. 

How to Use Blackboard for Course Management (especially in large classes)Pdf Icon
Handout from Faculty Forum workshop, June 11, 2003

Big, but Not Bad
Thomas Bartlett, Chronicle of Higher Education (5/9/03)
Teaching huge classes: successes and failures. 

Active Learning Elements
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Penn State University
Developing Students’ Writing, Speaking and Information Gathering Skills; Encouraging International/Intercultural Competence; Active and Collaborative Learning

Assignments
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Penn State University
Evaluating Assignments, Ensuring Students do the Reading, Reducing Plagiarism

Attendance
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Penn State University
Ecouraging Attendance; Taking Attendance; Keeping Students till the End of Class

Class Planning
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Penn State University
Highlighting Important Points; Addressing a Wide-Range of Student Abilities and Knowledge; Activities Other than Lectures; Redesigning the Course

Feedback
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Penn State University
How to get feedback, how to respond to feedback.

Notetaking
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Penn State University
Help students take better notes, how to keep students away from online notes from other sources.

Resources
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Penn State University
Working with TAs, addressing problems in the classroom.

Student Involvement/Participation
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Penn State University
Student Participation; Overcoming Anonymity; Encouraging Students to Participate.

Strategies for Learning Names
Teaching Resource Center, Indiana University
National Teaching and Learning Forum reprint 

The "Change-up" in Lectures
Joan Middendorf and Alan Kalish
National Teaching and Learning Forum (1996)

Long Classes

There is very little written about the challenges of teaching long classes. Thus, the material here has all been generated by Stern itself. In the link called Teaching Longer Classes in Quantitative Subjects, Ed Melnick and Robert Whitelaw outline how they approach longer classes, three-hours or more. In addition, other faculty members suggest additional strategies. Waking Them up After the Break consists of the results of a faculty brainstorming session. The Alternative Teaching/Learning Methods link includes a number of activities that change the mode of learning from the usual lecture. Finally, Paul Brown compiled some ideas for teaching in 3-hour time slots. There are other links on the CITL website, for examples, Active and Cooperative Learning, Case Studies, Discussion, that should be useful as you think about teaching long classes.

Teaching Longer Classes in Quantitative Subjects
Faculty Forum workshop, October 15, 2002
Facilitated by Stephanie Nickerson
 
Teaching Long Classes: Waking Them Up After Break IIPdf Icon
NYU Stern, February 2001
 
Alternative Teaching/Learning MethodsPdf Icon
Faculty Forum workshop, April 2, 2003
Facilitated by Stephanie Nickerson

Included are small group learning, ungraded quizzes, student presentations and others.
 
Tips for Teaching 3-Hour ClassesPdf Icon
Paul Brown, NYU Stern, August 2000 

Student Resources

You might want to include some of these links in your syllabus for easy student access to them from your Blackboard site.

MBA Honor Code, Code of Conduct, Policies and Procedures
NYU Stern School of Business 
 
Honor Code and Code of Conduct for Stern Undergraduates
NYU Stern School of Business 
 
Statement of Academic Integrity
NYU Expository Writing
Includes a definition of plagiarism and discusses academic fraud more broadly. 
 
College of Arts and Sciences Learning Center
Provides individual tutoring, course review sessions, academic success workshops and college transition seminars. Some group review sessions include MAP classes, Economics I and II, Money and Banking, Calculus and others. Closed during the summer. 
 
Henry & Lucy Moses Center for Students with Disabilities
Facilitates equal access to programs and services for students with disabilities.
 
NYU Virtual Business Library
Provides access to the electronic business resources and services available through Bobst Library.
 
New York University Writing Center
Assists with specific writing tasks and helps students develop useful strategies. The Writing Center does not act as an editing service.