NYU Stern

HEC: Student Feedback

Peer Evaluation- HEC

Name:
Roman Shteynberg

Highlight of my semester abroad:

Academically, I discovered what I want to do with my career and began outlining a path to reach my goals. Personally, I reconnected with my Russian roots, since I hung out with a large group of Russian students (most of who were on exchange as well). Lastly, all the traveling and local interaction enhanced my understanding of Europe and furthered my desire to live there.

You might be interested to know:
I drove from Moscow to Paris for IBEX. 1,802 miles (2,900 km). Three days of 10 hr + driving. And then I drove back. It was exhausting, yet awesome.

My career goal:
While on my semester abroad, I met an associate at a Parisian firm, which I would like to work for. The firm deals in M&A and provides sovereign advisory in Africa. I was always keen on working in the financial sector in Northern Africa, and in HEC I developed a lot of interest for the field of Project Finance.

Contact me about IBEX HEC, Paris:
Roman Shteynberg - rys218@stern.nyu.edu

Student Profile

Name: Erin Wang

Erin Wang_HEC

Highlight of my semester abroad:

It is a totally new experience living in a suburban campus at HEC, which is a lot different than living in NYU. Learning about the culture and appreciating the beauty of different countries across Europe is amazing. Paris is a beautiful city; I wish I could spend more time there.

An interesting fact about the country where I studied:

The French usually take a long lunch break, which is why some stores will close at noon for two hours or so. The real, traditional macaroons actually have no fancy color at all; they are just brownish, soft almond cookies. (The most famous Parisian Macaroon shop is Pierre Herme.)

You might be interested to know:
I love tennis; I watched two ATP Masters games in Paris.

What I would say to students interested in participating in IBEX:
IBEX can be a lot different than your typical study abroad programs. Studying in a different school entails a lot of flexibility, planning, and even some courage. The preparation work can seem daunting and confusing at first, so make sure you can get plenty of information about the partner schools before you make up your mind. I think the best way is to talk to people who went to those schools as well as to the incoming exchange students. And for people interested in the French schools, I would suggest learning some French before you go.

Contact me about IBEX HEC, Paris:

Erin Wang - mw1619@stern.nyu.edu


Feedback From Students

Housing

"I lived on campus. I had a single room with a private bathroom. It was 532 Euro per month. The building I lived in had a public kitchen with a table, some chairs, a fridge and stove. There was also a laundry room with one washer and one dryer. Other on-campus housing options are cheaper, but you will need to share a bathroom with one other person."

Expenses

Food: €75/week
Housing: €532/month, less if living in shared-bathroom or shared-apartment dorms
Books: Most teachers provide course materials free of charge
Phone: €20-40/month
Entertainment: €125/month
Local Transportation: €75/month
Airline ticket to/from IBEX site: €1,100 round trip
Independent travel: €3000

Banking

"I opened a local bank account with BNP Paribas. It took about a week and a half to get the debit card. I also had US cards that I used to withdraw money from ATMs. It’s better to have local debit or credit cards because a lot of merchants such as the ticket machines at metro stations only take cards with a Sim in it, which my US cards didn’t have. Even though I opened my account with BNP Paribas, I heard from others that LCL (another bank) also provides good service."

Academics

"At HEC, most electives only last for half a semester. For me, I had some classes that ended in the middle of the semester and some that started in the middle of the semester. For the half-term classes, they meet once for three hours every week, while the full-term classes meet twice for an hour and a half every week. Skill seminars (a special kind of discussion-based course with smaller groups of students) are usually held during the weekends. Most of my friends enjoyed these skill seminars, but you need to be willing to sacrifice a few weekends of going out."

"The courses at HEC really emphasize presentations. Most courses will base half of the grades on one or two big presentations. Most of the courses I took had no midterm or weekly assignment unlike the courses at Stern. Professors know their material very well and have in-depth knowledge of their fields, but may not organize the structure of the courses as well. The courses do not have TAs or office hours, so it’s more difficult to reach out to professors outside of classes. Course load is overall lighter than at Stern, but during finals you will get a lot busier. Grading is tougher than at Stern. There is no plus or minus in the letter grades. The grading system works slower than at Stern."

Course Recommendations

"New Product Development, Strategy of Negotiation Games, French, Wine Marketing"

Student Life

"Because the school is located in the suburb area of Paris, you will mostly spend time with people inside the school. Personally, I hung out with mostly international students because I lived in a building with mostly international students. The IS (International Student Organization) will organize orientations, travel trips, international dinners and parties so that international students can get to know each other better. One big part of the student life is the POW (Party of the Week); it is on every Thursday of the week and it is a great place to meet a lot of people, international or local. There are also extracurricular clubs where you can play sports and organize student activities with the French students; however they usually require longer commitment than one semester."

Culture Shock

"Not really, the local students are quiet nice. My building had mostly international students so I had a really good time getting to know people coming from all over Europe."

Travel Tips

"I had fewer classes in the first half of the semester, so I did a lot of traveling. Northern Europe can be very cold during winter so it’s better to travel there early in the semester. The IS will also arrange some cheap travel trips to some nearby French cities."

"For booking hotels and hostels, booking.com, hosterworld and hostelbooker are really good. In terms of traveling in France and to surrounding countries, taking the TGV (French high-speed trains) is a comfortable and fairly-priced option. Buses are also good for short-distance travel. Flying is quite expensive unless you book really early. Two major budget airlines are Ryanair and Easyjet. Taking Ryanair can be quite hectic because they have a lot of extra charges and the planes land at very remote airports."

Dining & Shopping

"As the campus is located in a suburb of Paris, there is only one restaurant right outside campus next to the one supermarket. The restaurant serves regular Italian food. That one supermarket is where most people go to get their groceries. The nearby little town Jouy has a few more restaurants, bakeries, bars, banks and a post office. The Versailles area (two train stations away) has more restaurants, movie theatres and more shopping places. There is also a weekly school bus that will take you to the shopping center. There is also a school trip to IKEA during orientation so that you can buy things for your room. But if you really want to have a great dinning and shopping experience, there is no better place to go than the city center of Paris, but the prices go way higher when going into the city."