NYU Stern

MBA Course Descriptions

NEW COURSE HIGHLIGHT:

Strategic Talent Management (MGMT-GB.2383)
with Robert Calamai
Summer 2013 (Westchester)
3 credits
This course will explore the issues and strategies surrounding the key human capital issues facing organizations and their leaders in today’s global business environment. This area of study is increasingly important as organizations seek to differentiate themselves in the marketplace through the contributions of their global teams. In addition, organizations in the future will increasingly sell more information and services, and fewer traditional “products”, and so the management of this human asset becomes even more critical. Objectives include: - Explanation of the overall theoretical framework for Human Capital Management and their practices in the business environment - Relate the practices and impact of different areas of HCM to each other and their implications for organizational and employee needs - Discussion of how the HR or HCM function adds value to the organization and is leveraged by key line leaders to achieve their goals The objectives noted above will be accomplished via exposure to the various course content, including case studies, articles, guest speakers, team projects and lectures.



CORE COURSES

Leadership in Organizations
COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

This course is about managing and thriving in organizations. It is based on the premise that management success requires (a) understanding how to manage organizations and (b) understanding how to manage people.

In the first part of the course, we will focus on understanding the relationship between an organization and its environment. What are the demands that organizations face in seeking to grow and thrive? What happens when the external environment changes (i.e., due to changes in technology, governmental regulations, or customer tastes)? What are the implications of an organization’s strategy for how it is designed? How does growth affect an organization? In this part of the course, we will learn about the “hardware” of organizations: structure and design.

In the middle portion of the course, we will learn about the “software” of organizations: culture, leadership, power and politics. What is culture, and how do you affect it? What influences the power dynamics within an organization? What role do control systems play? How do you manage change?

The third section focuses on sharpening students’ interpersonal skills as managers. To do this, we will learn and apply frameworks on how to manage work groups, facilitate group decision-making, resolve conflict, evaluate performance and motivate effort. Our premise here is that day-to-day business success requires being able to understand and manage social interactions.

At the end of the course, students should have a deeper and more complex understanding of organizational dynamics and the essential elements of managing organizations and the people within them. Students will leave this course more knowledgeable about how organizations work and how to be an effective manager.


Strategy I
COR1-GB.2103
1.5 credits
Langone students only

This course provides students with the concepts and tools required to devise strategies that enable the business to create superior value for chosen customers and to capture a sufficient share of that value in order to create an economic profit on its investment. The course focuses on the gaining of competitive advantages at the product/market level.

The course builds a model of competitive advantage, applies it to the competitive marketplace, and identifies the key sources by which firms can gain competitive advantage. It provides the basic set of tools that enable students to analyze and define the competitive situation at the product/market level, to delineate the strategic options open to the firm to create or retain competitive advantage. Students evaluate those options from several perspectives: strategic, financial, technological, legal and organizational, for business strategy is multi-dimensional.


Strategy II
COR1-GB.2104
Prerequisite: B01.2103
1.5 credits
Langone students only

This course focuses on the strategic management and understanding of multi-product, multi-location and multi-business firms, whereas Strategy I focused on strategically managing individual businesses. For instance, Strategy II issues include the evaluation of whether Disney should own theme parks, restaurants, television networks, and movie production and how the corporation can add value to the individual businesses. Strategy I issues include the assessment of strategies of the individual businesses relative to its competitors. For example, ABC’s (one of Disney’s television networks) strategies as a television network.

In this course, we adopt the perspective of top management who must be concerned with the overall viability of firms. General managers must be able to create a vision for the firm, developing and deploying corporate resources, capabilities and apply industry analysis and strategy analysis. They lead their team to create structures, systems and processes to implement corporate strategies. They must manage interpersonal dynamics of strategic decisions. Finally, managers must be able to communicate effectively their vision and strategies to internal and external stakeholders.

We consider both strategy formulation and implementation for the firm and the managers. We emphasize the close inter-relationships between what a firm wants to do and how it can go about doing it to achieve its objectives.


Strategy
COR1-GB.2301
3 credits
Full-time students only

This course studies two related issues. The first is how to gain advantage against competitors in the complex and dynamic global marketplace. Core business strategy themes include how to analyze the business environment, assess resources and capabilities, and choose competitive strategies. The second issue is how to create corporate value through configuring and coordinating multibusiness activities. Core corporate strategy themes include analyzing scale and scope, evaluating corporate competencies, managing the multibusiness corporation, and choosing corporate strategies.


ELECTIVES

Social Enterprise Development
MGMT-GB.2128
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
1.5 credits

This course introduces students to the burgeoning field of social entrepreneurship, which is defined as the process of creating new independent or corporate ventures that pursue the dual primary missions of social benefit and financial return on investment. These nonprofit and for-profit ventures have a social mission and aim to be financially self-sufficient or are profit driven. The course draws on historical and contemporary models to explore the unique range of issues and challenges facing the new social venture. Students focus on solutions to societal problems and evaluate the market opportunities for social venture creation. Students also explore the social capital markets and the trade-off between social and financial returns, and they discuss issues related to acquiring needed resources. Finally, the course examines the unique management and marketing strategies for the growing social venture. The principal teaching methods include class discussions, case studies, guest lecturers, and a business planning exercise.


Collaboration, Conflict and Negotiation
MGMT-GB.2159
1.5 credits

Successful managers know how to collaborate with other people effectively, and to resolve conflicts constructively. The goal of this course is to teach students the fundamentals of managing collaboration and conflict in one-on-one and small group settings. Our objective is to enhance students’ interpersonal skills at their jobs. Drawing from the latest findings in managerial psychology, we cover the fundamentals of effective negotiation, communication and persuasion. Special topics include: getting buy-in, coping with resistance, and building coalitions.


Advanced Topics in Negotiations
MGMT-GB.2160
Prerequisite: MGMT-GB.2159
1.5 credits

Advanced topics are presented to illustrate specialized concepts in managerial negotiations and decision making, such as negotiating cross-culturally, making effective group decisions, negotiating mergers and acquisitions, managing business integration teams. Topics vary from semester to semester; check registration packets and departmental bulletin boards for current offerings. Students may elect this course only once in their degree program.


Negotiating Complex Transactions with Executives and Lawyers
MGMT-GB.2161
Prerequisite: MGMT-GB.2159 or LAW-LW.10687
1.5 credits

In this innovative and practical course, students from the Law school and the Business school come together at Stern to learn what it takes to negotiate major transactions. Most key corporate deals- such as mergers, financings, international joint ventures and settlements- are legal/business problems. So it’s crucial for lawyers and business people to know how to work well together, and how to design wise agreements. To develop these skills, students negotiate a variety of simulated transactions and conflicts. They take one deal from concept to term sheet to contract and then see its effects months later. They grapple with whether to sue or settle. They even trade roles at least once. They also examine real agreements, perhaps meeting and questioning guest speakers who actually negotiated them. They also discover ways to design better transactions, with the help of economics and other important theoretical tools. Through their continuing work together, they overcome their natural feelings of professional culture shock and learn how to work as a team to create sound agreements- as their future employers expect them to do.

A basic course on negotiation, such as Collaboration, Conflict & Negotiation (B65.2159) or Lawyering (L06.2001) is a prerequisite for the course. The course is different from Stern’s Advanced Topics in Negotiation, which focuses mainly on negotiating in organizations. Neither is a pre-requisite for the other.

*Special Note for Law Students: Law students may elect to do one additional written project for the course, and will have one extra short session with the professor to introduce the project. The session is scheduled for 6-8 pm Thursday, October 26, the week before the course begins. While the course will end December 18, there is no final and assignments are scheduled to give law students time to prepare for other final exams. Students tend to fill the course quickly.


Corporate Governance
MGMT-GB.2176
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
1.5 credits

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts, tasks, and responsibilities of governing the corporation at the level of the board of directors, with particular emphasis on integrity, process, compliance, and strategy. Given the number and scale of recent board-related scandals, it also examines the factors in board form and function that lead to failures in corporate governance. Students learn primarily through the analysis of actual cases, and the class sessions are discussion-based with some lecture. Students prepare case analyses for class, some written, some oral, and perform an in-depth term project where one board of directors, or one particular board function, is analyzed in some depth. Several visitors from industry are brought to class to share their perspectives and experiences at appropriate times in the term. Modules of the course are designed to address specific governance issues, such as board composition and independence; the nomination process; audit and compensation committees and their functions; proxy processes and shareholder resolutions; tenders and takeovers; and legal compliance. As an integrative M.B.A. course, this course designed to be taken after the student has a fundamental understanding of issues in management, strategy, professional responsibility, and how firms interact in the marketplace. Prior coursework in these areas is strongly recommended.


Managing the Growing Company
MGMT-GB.2327
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

This course exposes students to the unique challenges of managing the growth of small businesses. It is designed for students who are interested in understanding the opportunities and problems involved in the start-up, management, or operation of their own business. In addition, the course is also designed for students who are considering employment in a smaller firm. The differences between small firms’ and large organizations’ management needs, practices, and financial resources are examined.


Family Business Management
MGMT-GB.2328
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

This course explores the business, personal and family issues found in family owned and operated companies. The managerial, strategic and behavioral complexities in these environments will be analyzed. The course focuses on these principal themes: 1) How are family businesses distinct from other firms? 2) What is the lifecycle of the family business? 3) What are the unique managerial challenges of family-owned businesses and how can they be successfully resolved?


Global Strategy
MGMT-GB.2340
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
3 credits

This course provides an understanding of the cultural, political, competitive, technological, legal, and ethical environment in which multinational firms operate. It surveys a range of tools and techniques of environmental analysis for use in assessing foreign and global conditions, opportunities, and threats. It then focuses on multinational corporate strategy, organization, and management. The course examines building of strategic capabilities, collaborating across boundaries, developing coordination and control, and managing activities and tasks, as well as challenges of worldwide functional management, geographic subsidiary management, and top-level headquarters management.


Managing High Performing Teams
MGMT-GB.2351
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

This course is aimed at improving students’ ability to develop and manage high-performing teams through effective design and development. Topics include characteristics of high-performing teams; managing team composition; monitoring stages of team growth; developing strategies for effective group decision making; developing a team-focused organizational culture; managing cross-boundary collaboration; managing cooperation and conflict within and across teams; team leadership; and evaluating and rewarding team performance. The course also addresses how organizations can foster innovation, strategic decision making, and cross-functional synergies through the use of teams. It emphasizes both theory and application/skill-building, using a variety of teaching methods.


Managing Change
MGMT-GB.2353
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

Contemporary business environments contain challenges that demand an increasing pace, volume, and complexity of organizational changes. Most organizations, whether they are entrepreneurial start-ups or long established Fortune 500 firms, find that they must change or wither. This course is geared toward deepening students’ understanding of the challenges, the techniques, and the burdens associated with initiating and implementing major change in an organization. The objective is to prepare managers, or their consultants and advisers, to meet the challenges of organizational change successfully. As such, the course is especially useful for students who plan careers in management consulting, general management (whether in line or staff positions), and entrepreneurship or corporate venturing.


Leadership Models
MGMT-GB.2363
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

This course is meant for those who wish to better understand and further develop their innate potential and propensity to lead others. As you rise in your career, you will need multiple and often conflicting constituencies on board to follow your vision. But if you don’t lead, others will not follow. This course will help you toward honing some of the essential self-reflective skills you need to give form and substance to such vision. It will also be of value to those who wish to have a broad intellectual understanding of the context of leading and the content of leadership.


International Social Impact Strategies
MGMT-GB.2366
Prerequisites: COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
3 credits

This course is intended to provide a socially relevant academic experience that combines classroom curriculum with hands-on learning in an international setting. The course is designed to help students gain in-depth insights into economic and social value creation in the developing world. Through case studies, lectures, field work and classroom dialogue, students will learn to think strategically and act opportunistically with a socially-conscious business mindset. Through an innovative partnership with firms located in India, Stern students will have the opportunity to apply their classroom learnings to real-world issues by conducting fieldwork abroad. Team-based projects will focus on areas including poverty alleviation, energy, health and sustainability. Students will gain exposure to various organizations’ models for addressing these issues, as well as to thoroughly-vetted international social enterprises that are making tangible and potentially scalable progress in serving the world’s poorest populations. Student teams will work with partner organizations to deliver on discrete projects designed to meet existing needs. In addition, project deliverables will facilitate the sharing of knowledge and best practices with the growing social impact sector.


Strategic Design
MGMT-GB.2370
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302, COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
3 credits

This course develops student skills at diagnosing organizations and developing prescriptions to improve their effectiveness. It is appropriate for those interested in organizational performance from a managerial or external perspective (e.g., management consultants, investment bankers,, and financial analysts). It examines organizations’ attempts to adapt as open systems in competitive environment. We consider the major factors influencing organization design, e.g., strategy, environment, and technology. Then we analyze the major internal processes affecting organizational performance, e.g., control systems, politics, and conflict. Then we probe how organizations can improve their ability to adapt in increasingly dynamic environments. The course includes domestic and international examples. The main learning methods are case analyses and a study of the organizations of the central competitors in an industry or industries that the class chooses. Particular emphasis is placed on organizational-level problems facing senior management.



Advanced Strategy: Tools
MGMT-GB.2375
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
3 credits
Advanced Strategy – Tools is an elective course on strategy. We will recap many of the components covered in core strategy and apply this material to additional cases. In addition, we will spend more time on the relationship between strategy and organizational attributes of the firm. This course has an emphasis on applying the tools and concepts of strategy with precision and attention to nuance. The cases are chosen because they fulfill the following criteria: • The issues addressed are topical • They are more nuanced than typical core strategy cases • They generate an opportunity to explore related regulatory, technological, social or organizational content • They generate interesting follow up questions By thoroughly discussing each case and by following up with additional information relevant to the uncertainties faced by the case protagonists, we will generate insights into the challenges of implementing various options. In this course, we seek answers to the following questions: What could go wrong? How do we correct it through better design of structure? The course follows an interactive, discussion driven format. My expectation is that you come to class having thoroughly read the assignments for that class. Generally, 3-4 class sessions are led by guests who have many years of experience in the industry under consideration. In addition, some class sessions set aside for group presentations.



Strategic Talent Management
MGMT-GB.2383
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits
This course will explore the issues and strategies surrounding the key human capital issues facing organizations and their leaders in today’s global business environment. This area of study is increasingly important as organizations seek to differentiate themselves in the marketplace through the contributions of their global teams. In addition, organizations in the future will increasingly sell more information and services, and fewer traditional “products”, and so the management of this human asset becomes even more critical. Objectives include: - Explanation of the overall theoretical framework for Human Capital Management and their practices in the business environment - Relate the practices and impact of different areas of HCM to each other and their implications for organizational and employee needs - Discussion of how the HR or HCM function adds value to the organization and is leveraged by key line leaders to achieve their goals The objectives noted above will be accomplished via exposure to the various course content, including case studies, articles, guest speakers, team projects and lectures.



Managerial Decision Making
MGMT-GB.3151
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
1.5 credits
This course attempts to help you become a better decision maker. When asked about their ability to make decisions, previous students expresses concerns and several said they lacked self-confidence in making decisions. Others indicated that the process of making decisions may be painful, especially if one has to make an important decision. This may stem from the deliberation process one goes through that may be stressful. Yet others added that at times they second-guess their decisions and some acknowledged that they suffer from regret when a decision they have made led to an undesired outcome. A few mentioned that having gone through such a process made them indecisive and unclear about how to go about making decisions. The above concerns are described with regard to personal as well as business decisions. Making decisions at work may be easier when one can solicit the help from colleagues but at the same time the consequences may loom even larger when making decisions at work. This course takes a systematic approach to improve your decision-making skills. Requirements include several exercises, knowledge of statistics is required but the course is not about quantitative calculation of alternatives but about the processes underlying the making of decisions.



Corporate Governance: Law & Business
MGMT-GB.3318
3 credits
This is a special full semester section of Corporate Governance including faculty and students from both the Stern School of Business and the NYU School of Law. The emphasis in this section is on the interdisciplinary legal and business aspects of corporate governance. The objective is to facilitate professional interaction and joint work between students from both schools.



Strategies: Mergers & Acquisitions
MGMT-GB.3319
3 credits
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
AND COR1-GB.2311
This MBA course explores the various modes of Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) strategies available to firms to create and capture economic value. The objectives of the course are (1) to equip students with a set of analytical and qualitative tools to assess the drivers and consequences of different types of M&As, and (2) to provide insight into the successful management of M&As covering the whole process from conception to action. While more emphasis is given to large, established firms, the course also deals with entrepreneurial ventures to the extent that they face analogous competitive, financial, and organizational challenges. Students enrolling in the course will draw from various sources of knowledge about M&As ---cutting-edge academic research, real-world experience from the strategy work of the instructor and other students in class, and case discussions illustrating the principles behind strategic decisions. This course is meant to be more technical than the core Strategy couse (MBA). By examining the modes of growth and restructuring of the firm from a strategic management perspective, the course reinforces other offerings in the Strategy specialization; moreover, by focusing on mergers and acquisitions, the course also complements other MBA courses in Economics, Finance, and Law more broadly.


Developing Managerial Skills
MGMT-GB.3321
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

Many companies bestow a management title on key talent and expect appropriate behavior to follow. That is not the most effective way to develop future business leaders. Increasing self-awareness and being open to feedback are important first steps in leading today’s business for tomorrow’s results. This course focuses primarily on the practical aspects of managing. While based on solid research, it stresses a hands-on approach to improving students’ management skills. Each session focuses on (a) developing personal skills: self-awareness, managing stress, solving problems, and creativity; (b) interpersonal skills: coaching; counseling; supportive communication; gaining power and influence; motivating self and others; and managing conflict; and (c) group skills: empowering and delegating and building effective teams. Class sessions also give students an opportunity to assess, learn, analyze, practice, and “apply” the above skills to their own work situation so that they can turn good ideas into accepted practice. Students learn not just about management skills but also how to apply those skills to get results.


Game Theory
MGMT-GB.3323
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
3 credits

Game theory studies competitive and cooperative behavior in strategic environments, where the fortunes of several players are intertwined. It provides methods for identifying optimal strategies and predicting the outcome of strategic interactions. The field of game theory began around 1900 when mathematicians began asking whether there were optimal strategies for parlor games such as chess and poker, and, if so, what these strategies might look like. The first comprehensive formulation of the subject came in 1944 with the publication of the book Theory of Games and Economic Behavior by famous mathematician John von Neumann and eminent economist Oskar Morgenstern. As its title indicates, this book also marked the beginning of the application of game theory to economics. Since then, game theory has been applied to many other fields, including political science, military strategy, law, computer science, and biology, among other areas. In 1994 three pioneers in game theory were awarded a Nobel Prize, marking the ‘arrival’ of the field. Among the other applications, game theory today is finding its way into the world of business. (Pick up a business magazine or book and there is a good chance that it will use some game-theory jargon, such as zero-sum game, Prisoner’s Dilemma, win-win game, etc.) As well as learning the underlying theory in the course, we’ll be looking at how game theory can indeed be applied to business.


Advanced Strategic Analysis
MGMT-GB.3328
Prerequisites: COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
3 credits
Globalization and the quickening pace of technological demographic and political changes have produced major shifts in the way firms compete. It is harder to prosper in this new more turbulent business environment marked by complex competitive battles and alliances across many national borders. It is more difficult to spot clear sustainable competitive advantages amid today’s digital revolution which is causing the convergence a number of industries into each other’s traditional turf. Companies need to be run by managers who possess finely tuned skills in competitive market dynamics and advanced strategy techniques. This course explains major new strategy concepts and analytics plus how to quantify the sources of competitive advantage. It focuses on each student’s skills development. Students work in teams and alone to practice each skill by comparing and contrasting vital strategies exploited by competing firms in different industries. It explores the essential role of leadership in spearheading strategic change in organizational structure, culture, and direction, as key sources of sustainable competitive advantage. The course evaluates choices in competitive options that create economic value and preempt competitors responses.


Business Start-Up Practicum
MGMT-GB.3333
Prerequisites: MGMT-GB.3335 OR MGMT-GB.3336 OR MGMT-GB.3337
3 credits

This course seeks to provide an understanding of business planning techniques that transform ideas into viable commercial businesses. Students will conduct the market, organizational, operational, strategic and financial analyses that are required to produce a venture concept and an actionable business plan. Participants will study firms’ business planning efforts as well as create a business plan during the practicum. The course focuses on these principal themes: (1)How do entrepreneurs create business concepts and solve challenges? (2) How does one qualify ideas and strategies in order to effectively select a course of action? (3) How are action-oriented plans structured in order to capture opportunity and mitigate risks?


Foundations of Entrepreneurship
MGMT-GB.3335
3 credits

This course offers a framework for understanding the entrepreneurial process and exposes the student to most problems and issues faced by entrepreneurs who start new businesses. Case study is the principal teaching method, supplemented by lectures, a business planning exercise, and guest speakers. Major objectives are for students to learn how to identify and evaluate market opportunities; develop a business concept and marketing plan; assess and obtain the required resources; and manage the growth of a new venture.


Social Entrepreneurship
MGMT-GB.3336
3 credits

This course introduces students to the burgeoning field of social entrepreneurship, which is defined as the process of creating new independent or corporate ventures that pursue the dual primary missions of social benefit and financial return on investment. These nonprofit and for profit ventures have a social mission and aim to be financially self-sufficient or are profit driven. The course will draw on historical and contemporary models to explore the unique range of issues and challenges facing the new social venture. The course teaches students to focus on solutions to societal problems and to evaluate the market opportunities for social venture creation. We-will also explore the social capital markets and the trade off between social and financial returns, and discuss issues related to acquiring needed resources. Finally, the course will examine the unique management and marketing strategies for the growing social venture.

The course will be open to all students who have completed or are concurrently taking the Foundations of Entrepreneurship course or those with prior permission from the professor based on a demonstrated interest in social venture creation. The principal teaching methods include class discussions, case studies, guest lecturers, and a business planning exercise.


Foundations of Technology Entrepreneurship

MGMT-GB.3337
3 credits
This course is designed to help students learn how to identify and evaluate technology commercialization opportunities, develop a technology-based business concept, acquire and sustain required resources, and manage the challenges involved in growing a technology-based venture. Relevant areas of technology innovation include, but are not limited to, information and communication, life sciences, and clean environment.


Managing Innovation
MGMT-GB.3356
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.2301 (or COR1-GB.2103 and COR1-GB.2104)
3 credits

Technological innovation and new product development (NPD) are critically important to the creation of business opportunities and sustenance of wealth. This course offers perspectives and frameworks that seek to understand technological innovation and NPD at different levels of analysis, including the firm, industry, and national levels. It addresses issues pertaining to the discovery, development, and diffusion of technological advances. For example, we attempt to understand the innovation process in both start-up and established firms, and when established firms have an easier (or more difficult) time bringing a new product to market and appropriating profits from it. We also provide frameworks for assessing new technological and business opportunities. Students are expected to analyze and evaluate technological opportunities using the frameworks and techniques presented in the course. Most students who take the course have career interests in consulting (operations or management), general management, entrepreneurship, technology/new media, or marketing, but students from all disciplines are welcome.


Power and Politics in Organizations
MGMT-GB.3366
Prerequisite: COR1-GB.1302
3 credits

This course considers the way political processes and power structures influence decisions and choices made within and by organizations. It analyzes the sources, distribution, and. use of influence in relation to resource allocation, organizational change and performance, management succession, procedural justice, policy formulation, and social movements within organizations. It develops skills in diagnosing and using power and politics in organizational settings. A basic assumption underlying the course is that managers need well-developed skills in acquiring and exercising power to be effective. The course is designed to (1) improve students’ capacity to diagnose organizational issues in terms of their political dimensions and (2) enhance their effectiveness in their jobs and careers as a result of that improved capacity.