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Course Announcements


Spring 2017 Course Announcements

Business & Society

Sustainability and Competitive Advantage
BSPA-GB.2305 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Tensie Whelan
Mondays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Social Innovation & Impact; Leadership & Change Management; Supply Chain Management

In this course, students will develop a effective leadership perspective through pursuit of the following learning objectives: 1) to become familiar with the key environmental and social issues effecting business today, 2) to understand the evolution of corporate response—from compliance to engagement to innovation, 3) to begin to develop some of the skills required for leading in this new social and political environment (e.g. multi-stakeholder management), 4) to explore the efficiencies and innovations being developed by corporate leaders in pursuit of sustainability, 5) to explore innovations in finance (true cost accounting, net positive value, social impact bonds), and 6) to become familiar with the latest consumer insight research on sustainability. In short, this course is multi-disciplinary, and seeks to integrate across the functions of the firm to arrive at an effective firm-wide leadership sensibility.


Economics

Economic Transformation of Healthcare
ECON-GB.2111 (1.5 Credits)
Prof. Cliff Bleustein
Specializations: Economics

This course is designed to give the student a general understanding of applied economics of healthcare. It provides an advanced critical analysis of the delivery of healthcare services and how it is constantly changing. It evaluates the responses of major players including hospitals, physicians, payers, life sciences and new entrants to the market. As expectations for a unified, efficient, cost effective, and high quality global system continue to be desired, the entire ecosystem is trying to adapt. At the end of the course, students will understand why economics in Healthcare is constantly changing and the major drivers impacting the system. While this course is an economics course, it is focused on the application of principles in real life settings and uses current events to highlight their impact. We also try and touch upon regulatory reform and understand how each constituent has an impact on the others within the system. In order to bring in other perspectives, c-suite level executives are brought in as guests.

Health Care Markets
ECON-GB.2374 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Michael Dickstein
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Economics

In this course we will apply the tools of economic analysis to study how medical care is produced and financed, in both the private and public sectors. Our emphasis will be on the United States, with a brief treatment of health economics research in other countries and comparisons of health systems in other developed and less developed countries. We will use economics to evaluate why the health care market is different from conventional markets and what economic analysis can tell us about these differences. This will include studying such matters as why health insurance exists, whether hospital competition leads to efficient allocation of resources and production, the role of the physician in treatment choice and the role for government and market interventions in correcting potential inefficiencies. Through the example of the health care sector, we will examine many of the important issues in economics and management, including decision-making under uncertainty, principal-agent theory, moral hazard, and market power.


Finance

Digital Currency, Blockchains, & Future of Fin Ser
FINC-GB.3324 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. David Yermack & Prof. Geoffrey Miller
Specializations: Finance; Financial Instruments & Markets; Law & Business; FinTech

This course is an expanded version of FINC-GB.2134, a mini-course that was introduced in Fall 2014 bearing the same name. This 3 credit course explores economic, financial and legal aspects of Bitcoin and other alternative payment mechanisms. Topics include the origins of Bitcoin, its relationship to a world dominated by fiat currencies, execution of transactions in Bitcoin, how well Bitcoin satisfies the basic functions of money, risks inherent for consumers and businesses who use Bitcoin, the legal and regulatory aspects of Bitcoin, among other topics. Going beyond Bitcoin and payment mechanisms, the course will develop the architecture underlying the blockchain approach to executing and settling transactions in a wide range of settings. The course will examine how blockchain execution may impact the financial services industry in the near and distant future.

Impact Investing Experiential Learning Seminar
FINC-GB.3355 (3.0 Credits)
Professor Steven Godeke and Professor Richard Levich
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00pmm
Specializations: Finance; Social Innovation and Impact

This course combines the experience of a semester-long consulting engagement focused on a live impact investing opportunity or challenge facing a family office with classroom lectures and expert guest speakers from the impact investing field. Among established institutional investors, the mission and objectives of family offices are likely to be more varied than the metrics that commonly drive mutual fund or pension fund managers. In particular, with multi-generational investment horizons and the ability to flexibly deploy capital, family offices sit in a unique position to incorporate impact investment strategies into their operations. This course assembles a small number of family or multi-family offices, each one supporting a project designed around a theme or objective specific to the family office’s needs. The project serves as a focal point for students to deepen their knowledge of impact investing and develop an awareness of the issues facing institutions that engage in ESG related investments.

Entrepreneurial Finance: Focus on FinTech
FINC-GB.3362 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Sabrina Howell
Mondays, 6:00-9:00pm; Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Entrepreneurship; Finance; Corporate Finance; FinTech

This course examines the lifecycle of high-growth new ventures (i.e. startups), with a focus on how they are funded. We will follow a successful startup’s path from founding through the stages of new venture finance. These include developing a business plan and its financials, the core skills of valuation, the venture capital industry, and how entrepreneurs and investors realize returns. Through examples of specific companies and technologies, we will also learn about the emerging landscape of financial technology (fintech) startups. We will consider the following subsectors, where startups are either seeking to displace incumbents or sell them their services: personal finance, blockchain, equity crowdfunding, lending (peer-to-peer and AI-augmented), payments, insurance, institutional investment, and money transfer.


Information, Operations, and Management Sciences

Fundamentals of Digital Marketing Technologies
INFO-GB.3347 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. George Pappachen
Saturdays, 1:00-4:00pm
Specializations: Business Analytics, Management of Technology

In this foundational course, you’ll get a sound overview of the nuances of digital media and advertising, as well as how the marketplace has evolved over time as standard approaches were introduced into the process. You’ll also gain a greater understanding of the different types of digital formats, the commerce ecosystem that drives the usage of these formats, and a review of the companies – both large and small – that comprise this vast and complex digital media ecosystem. You’ll have a practical understanding of the way digital advertising campaigns work and the players that are involved. We will explore critical topics such as digital media ad formats, creative capabilities, targeting, campaign optimization, and consumer behavior.


Interarea

Narrative & Numbers
INTA-GB.2140 (1.5 Credits)
Prof. Scott Galloway & Prof. Dhananjay Gode
Mondays, 6:00-9:00pm

This half-semester course will show you how successful execution of strategy drives valuation. Understanding this link is critical for success as an entrepreneur, senior manager, or analyst. We view this course as a capstone (and fun) course that brings together many subjects that you have learned at Stern. This course is based on the following five themes: Amazon, Multi-channel, Social Platforms, Digital IQ: Retail and Digital IQ: Manufacturer's Brands.

Tech Industry Drivers
INTA-GB.2307 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Dhananjay Gode
Thursdays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Entertainment, Media and Technology; Product Management

This course will teach students how to identify core drivers of tech companies and how tech companies differ in the execution of their business plans to exploit these drivers. The structure of the course is similar to the Business Drivers of Industries course except that this course is focused on the tech industry. You should take this course if you are interested in working at a tech company (strategy, product management, corporate finance, business development, digital marketing), tech banking, buy-side and sell-side research focused on tech, private equity/venture capital focused on tech, or starting your own tech company. Even if you believe that you will not be looking at financial statements, it is still good idea to understand how strategic choices and execution translate into financial outcomes. The course will cover about 60 tech companies separated into 12 groups. Some of the interesting companies (e.g., AirBnb and Uber) are not public yet, so their financials are not available. Therefore, these companies will be covered once they go public.

FinTech Risk Management
INTA-GB.2312 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Thomas Philippon, Prof. Bernard Donefer & Prof. Michael Pinedo
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Business Analytics; Finance; Financial Systems; FinTech; Supply Chain Management

This class explores how FinTech changes the practice of risk management in financial firms. Risk management requires understanding, measuring, and managing market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, and operational risk. The class presents the technology behind enterprise risk systems and shows how to manage risk using quantitative models. We consider how recent FinTech innovations such as Blockchains, mobile technologies, etc., can change the way these risk systems operate, and create a new demand for talents in risk departments. We also study the specific risk management and regulatory challenges faced by FinTech firms. The class has two main objectives. The first objective is to introduce the principles of risk management that anyone working for a financial firm needs to understand. The second objective is to discuss specific opportunities and challenges created by the use of new technologies in finance.


Management Communication

Communication for Consultants: International
MCOM-GB.3312 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Susan Stehlik and Prof. Aline Wolff
Mondays & Wednesdays, 9:00-10:20am
Specializations: Global Business

The existing consulting course (MCOM-3311: Communication for Consultants) gives students the opportunity to work as a consulting team for real clients in a variety of industries. In this course, clients will be from Singapore and students will have the opportunity to go to Singapore during Spring break to meet with those clients. Students will also attend classes at Singapore Management University to understand the culture of doing business in Singapore. The final project will be a recommendation or answer to a research question from the client. Presentations will be arranged through video conferencing. Currently Oracle Systems, Banyon Tree Holdings and the Singaporean Housing Authority have been identified as potential clients.

Travel dates for this course are March 13 through March 17.


Management & Organizations

GLAM: The Globalization of Management
MGMT-GB.2342 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Pankaj Ghemawat
Mondays & Wednesdays, 9:00-10:20am
Specializations: Global Business

The Globalization of Management (GLAM) focuses on globalization and its implications for business. The emphasis will be on going beyond the “just-do-it” approach to globalization to thinking about globalization moves in a way that is anchored in the realities of the global business environment and looks at their personal and business implications. From a business perspective, the implications for a range of key functional areas will be discussed, not just the implications for business strategy—although the latter will be a key focus. The GLAM course is designed to be delivered in a blended format with alternating in and out-of-class sessions. The course is split into four modules that review the facts about globalization on a spectrum of macro to managerial to personal aspects and spark reflections about the future agenda for global business leaders. Differences between countries that underlie observed levels and patterns of cross-border integration are explored, as are their strategic/functional implications.


Marketing

Luxury Marketing
MKTG-GB.2326 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Thomai Serdari
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Luxury Marketing; Marketing

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of luxury. When was the concept of luxury first articulated and what did it mean? How did the products, consumer tastes, material exchanges, and producer strategies evolve through time? What is the state of the luxury industry today? Additionally, students will be introduced to principles of luxury branding, design thinking and how these are used as tools to define luxury business strategies. By the end of this course students will have developed: a. An understanding of the luxury segment as it applies to a variety of industries b. The vocabulary to articulate the nuances that differentiate these products c. The critical skills to identify potential new luxury products and how they relate to a variety of markets d. Analytical skills by hands-on experience and business case analysis, discussion, etc. e. The critical skills to distinguish/discover faults in business strategies that are not compatible with or contradict the essence of a particular luxury brand.

Strategy in Technology Intensive Industries
MKTG-GB.3152 (1.5 Credits)
Prof. Peter Markham
Thursdays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Entertainment, Media and Technology; Marketing

This course provides an introduction to the strategic management of technology-intensive businesses as well as providing an understanding of how technology is creating opportunities and threats across a myriad of traditional industries. In this course we will seek to understand the strategic dynamics of technology markets, examine how firms – both inside and outside of the technology sector – can leverage technologies to innovate and achieve sustainable competitive advantages. The course will take students inside the minds of protagonists who manage businesses across the technology industries through a combination of lectures, guest speakers and student-led projects. We will cover a broad range of timely technology sectors including Cloud Computing, SaaS, Data Centers, Wireless Networks, Mobile Communications, Fintech, Payments, Blockchain, OTT Media, Marketing Tech, Advertising Tech, Big Data, Business Intelligence and Predictive Analytics.


Spring 2017 By-Permission Only Courses

Business & Society

Social Problem-Based Entrepreneurship
BSPA-GB.3337.30 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Hans Taparia
Mondays, 6:00-9:00pm, and trip in January (see syllabus)
See syllabus for application

Social Problem-based Entrepreneurship kicks off with a trip to India and ends with what should be a blueprint for your social venture! By combining "on-the-ground" field work with classroom brainstorming and theory, teams will identify real-world social problems and develop market-based solutions for them. The class is open to multiple graduate schools including Stern, Tisch, Wagner and Gallatin, making the class unique for addressing problems from multiple perspectives, and well poised as an incubator of social ventures. The class will form start-up teams that will identify their problem, determine opportunities in an Indian or global context, generate ideas, create prototypes, develop business models, and examine customer acquisition.


Finance

Managing Investment Funds
FINC-GB.3320.20 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Anthony Marciano
Tuesday & Thursdays, 12:00-1:20pm
For application, visit stern.nyu.edu/~mpsif

Managing Investment Funds is a capstone course that requires students to draw on their knowledge of finance as well as macroeconomics, accounting, competitive analysis, strategy, marketing and other fields to manage a $1.5 million endowment fund held by New York University. In addition to honing their analytical skills, by organizing all activities related to institutional asset management, students gain experience in financial writing and oral presentations, advancing financial decisions in a group setting, and handling all of the governance and fiduciary responsibilities of a university endowment fund. The central mission of this course is for students to learn through having practical, hands on investment management experience. Because of the time requirements in formulating an investment strategy, screening and reviewing prospective stocks, updating the status and performance of existing positions, and all of the ancillary duties connected with the operation of a real, live portfolio, the experiential or hands-on component consumes the bulk of class time. However, a related mission is for students to acquire knowledge about institutional funds management and current industry practices and trends. This more traditional learning experience comes through readings and presentations from industry professionals.

Private Equity Deal Analysis and Simulation
FINC-GB.3368.20 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Gustavo Schwed
Tuesday & Thursdays, 3:00-4:20pm
See syllabus for application

This course will cover a single leveraged buyout transaction. Students will divide into groups each playing the role of a private equity firm analyzing and bidding for the business. Students will have access to material from a real LBO transaction. The course will be structured to follow a typical private equity auction. Students will learn about deal process, due diligence, valuation, deal tactics. Bidding groups will be presented with several value creation options which will potentially affect the performance of the business post acquisition. The winning bidder will be the highest bidder but the winner of this simulation will not necessarily be the winner of the auction. It is possible the winner will have overpaid and generated unacceptable returns. The winner of the simulation will be the highest bidder that generates acceptable private equity market returns. Deliverables will include first and second round bid documents, investment committee presentations, valuation analyses and questions for the management presentation.


Information, Operations & Management Sciences

Tech and The City
INFO-GB.2345.20 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Arun Sundararajan
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:30-2:50pm
See syllabus for application or visit the OSE website

Have you ever wondered what it's like to run a high-tech startup? This course provides students with immersive experiential learning about digital entrepreneurship through the lens of successful early-stage technology companies. Student teams are embedded into different New York City-based startups from the investment portfolios of Union Square Ventures and other tech-focused venture capital firms. Students work with founders and investors to understand business models, assess metrics and their connection to growth and funding, and lead a customer-centric assessment of the company's products. Activities include structured discussions, journal writing, in-class peer presentations coupled with guest sessions from industry experts. They emerge from the course with an experience-based appreciation of the transformative potential of digital technologies, of the tech entrepreneurship environment of NYC, and the risks faced by high-tech startups that underinvest in understanding their customers.


Management

Consulting Practice
MGMT-GB.3306.30 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Sonia Marciano & Prof. Keshava Dasarthy
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00pm
See syllabus for application or visit the OSE website

Graduate management students and the organizations that hire them are increasingly demanding that management education be directly applicable to real-world needs. The Consulting Practice course in conjunction with the Stern Consulting Corps (SCC) is a hands-on experiential learning opportunity that will allow students to work in teams to tackle a business issue or opportunity for a prominent for-profit or non-profit firm while applying in real time the key steps of the consulting process they are learning in the classroom. Because the projects are interdisciplinary, this course enables students to fuse theory with practice and allows them to gain hands on experience.


Marketing

Commerce & Craft Cinema
MKTG-GB.2313.0A (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Alvin Lieberman
Trip and Pre-/Post-trip meetings (see syllabus)
See syllabus for application

This is a specialized EMT course designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of the film industry including the complete process from crafting the idea for a film script, hiring or becoming a producer, financing the project, selling it to a studio or independent production company, building a team, production elements, post production including music acquisition, marketing, distribution and exhibition, international, and domestic. The course includes learning about distribution and exhibition, marketing and building audience awareness, research applications, international licensing, and preparation for career in the industry. It is offered during spring break and involves a trip to the west coast. In addition to tuition, students have to pay travel and living expenses.


Operations

Operations in Panama
OPMG-GB.2312.0A (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Harry Chernoff & Prof. Kristen Sosulski
Trip and Pre-/Post-trip meetings (see syllabus)
See syllabus for application

This advanced elective will be a 3-credit course studying the major businesses operating in Panama. During a one-week visit, students will observe and study the intricacies of the Panama Canal from an operations management point of view. Process techniques and strategies abound within this fascinating operation. Although the canal is certainly the country's major attraction, financial revenues from the canal have allowed Panama to emphasize other developments including real estate projects and major tourism improvements. Specific topics studied will include: the Panama Canal and its effect on the global shipping supply chain, history of the canal and independence of Panama, modern banking and real estate development, economic growth in the tourism industry, urban development and infrastructure of major cities. All of the classes, tours, speaker sessions and group meetings must be attended by students for course credit. No exceptions. The course will be limited in enrollment. Details will be announced.


Fall 2016 Course Announcements

Interarea

Fintech Analytics: Data-Driven Credit Modeling
INTA-GB.2320.10 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Roger Stein
Mondays, 6:00-9:00pm

This course focuses on the practical challenges that arise in implementing a variety of credit models (e.g. bankruptcy and default models retail and commercial entitles). We explore a number of data-driven approaches to modeling the likelihood that credit-risky borrowers will default on their obligations using large data sets. This course tends heavily towards discussions of practical model implementation and the "frictions" that make these implementations difficult in real-world settings. We discuss a number of modeling frameworks for estimating default probabilities (PDs) and loss given default LGD. We do not focus as heavily on the structure of credits markets or the details of pricing a broad variety of credit-risky instruments.


Management & Organizations

Globalization and Risk Management
MGMT-GB.2140 (1.5 Credits)
Prof. Robert Salomon
Specializations: Management, Strategy, Global Business

The central objective of this course is to understand the strategic management of global firms and the institutional (political, cultural, and economic) features of global markets. It is designed to help students manage the complex and nuanced risks that global companies face. Students will not only learn about institutional risk, but they will also be required to quantify institutional risk in their various assignments and develop an original institutional risk pricing tool. The students will then learn how to use this tool to complement existing strategic and financial analyses. This course is pertinent for students who intend to pursue careers in management consulting, general management, investment banking, private equity, venture capital, and other careers in the global context where accurate and concise strategic risk assessments are critical.


Marketing

Predicting the Future of Technology
MKTG-GB.2192.10 (1.5 Credits)
Prof. Amy Webb
Specializations: Marketing; Entertainment, Media & Technology

This class is designed to answer questions such as: What technology is on the horizon? How will it impact our society? How will various industries harness the tech trend? Where does the trend create potential new business partnerships or collaborators for us? How does this trend impact immediate/adjacent industry and all of its parts? How will the wants, needs, and expectations of our customers and our society change as a result of this trend? We will systematically explore the future in order to forecast it so that we might all make better decisions in the present. This is not a class about today’s hottest trends, though I will offer deep insights into what key areas to watch. Instead, this class presents a process for identifying and acting on those trends. No technical skills are required. You don’t need to be a statistician or a research scientist. The process is straightforward, intuitive, and adaptable.

Brilliant Execution
MKTG-GB.2367.10 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Adam Allenson
Mondays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Marketing

Consumers don’t see the brand strategy, the situation analysis, the Power Points, the copious research findings. They do see – and experience – the outcome the execution of the strategy, from product design to packaging, advertising to promotions, customer service to social media. In this workshop-based course, students will immerse themselves in what it takes to bring a brand strategy to life, all the practical and pragmatic aspects of marketplace execution. Utilizing a wide range of actual brand strategies, from companies large and small, students will learn how to assess which points of touch with the consumer are most advantageous relative to meeting a given objective, how to determine the best use of a budget, be it generous or less so, and how to work most effectively with communications agencies in areas of both traditional and emerging media.

Next Gen Fashion Retail
MKTG-GB.2376.10 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Jeffrey Carr & Prof. Lawrence Lenihan
Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00pm
Specializations: Marketing; Luxury Marketing

The retail industry will undergo more changes in the next 10 years than it has in the past 100. Driving this change is the Internet as it connects brands directly to customers, changing every element of the traditional distribution channels. We will explore these changes across the business architecture with a specific focus on brand channel strategy and the changing relationship with third-party channel partners. While the course perspective and case material is brand centric, the traditional retail channel business model will be examined extensively to understand the enormity of the changes facing channel leaders today and their role in the “fashion brand of tomorrow.” The course will include a study of channel economics, known as traditional “retail math” as part of understanding the relationship between brands and third-party retailers. As part of this learning, the role of full-price vs. constant discount promotions and the accompanying economic drivers of product gross margin and operational expenses will be examined in the context of creating the new businesses of tomorrow.


Business and Society

Corporate Governance - Who Is In Charge?
BSPA-GB.2176.10 (1.5 Credits)
Prof. Sam Liss
Thursdays, 6:00-9:00pm

Corporate Governance has evolved to be one of the more compelling and challenging subjects in business and society. Governance is a multi-faceted topic that has financial, economic, ethical, legal, regulatory, and sociological dimensions. Its impact has increased with the ever-growing power and scope of modern business corporations. Its imperfections have been demonstrated by a distressingly long list of spectacular business failures.  What is a productive framework to understand the complex relationship and decision processes among directors, management and shareholders/stakeholders? How should we measure the issues around topics such as company valuation, acquisition or outright sale of the business, social responsibilities, and regulatory forces?
 
It is critically important for NYU MBA graduates to be familiar with corporate governance dynamics. Many of you are likely to have a responsibility in your evolving careers to engage with corporate public and private boards as a member of management or as an advisor, and as well in serving as active members of Boards of Directors (both for- profit and non- profit) or participating in governance issues as investors.

Instructor Background- Sam Liss
 
Prof. Liss is an Adjunct Professor of Finance at Stern and a Stern MBA, teaching courses in Corporate Governance, Professional Responsibility and Risk & Insurance. He is also a principal in a strategy advisory firm and serve on both public company and private company Boards in the financial and business services arena.


Fall 2016 By-Permission Only Courses

Finance

Managing Investment Funds
FINC-GB.3320.01 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Anthony Marciano
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00-1:20pm
For application, visit stern.nyu.edu/mpsif

Managing Investment Funds is a capstone course that requires students to draw on their knowledge of finance as well as macroeconomics, accounting, competitive analysis, strategy, marketing and other fields to manage a $1.5 million endowment fund held by New York University. In addition to honing their analytical skills, by organizing all activities related to institutional asset management, students gain experience in financial writing and oral presentations, advancing financial decisions in a group setting, and handling all of the governance and fiduciary responsibilities of a university endowment fund. The central mission of this course is for students to learn through having practical, hands on investment management experience. Because of the time requirements in formulating an investment strategy, screening and reviewing prospective stocks, updating the status and performance of existing positions, and all of the ancillary duties connected with the operation of a real, live portfolio, the experiential or hands-on component consumes the bulk of class time. However, a related mission is for students to acquire knowledge about institutional funds management and current industry practices and trends. This more traditional learning experience comes through readings and presentations from industry professionals. The endowment funds under management operate as the Michael Price Student Investment Fund (MPSIF). The Fund began in early 2000 thanks to a generous gift from Michael F. Price.


Management

Consulting Practice
MGMT-GB.3306.10 (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Sonia Marciano & Prof. Prashant Ghandi
Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00pm
See syllabus for application or visit SCC.

Graduate management students and the organizations that hire them are increasingly demanding that management education be directly applicable to real-world needs. The Consulting Practice course in conjunction with the Stern Consulting Corps (SCC) is a hands-on experiential learning opportunity that will allow students to work in teams to tackle a business issue or opportunity for a prominent for-profit or non-profit firm while applying in real time the key steps of the consulting process they are learning in the classroom. Because the projects are interdisciplinary, this course enables students to fuse theory with practice and allows them to gain hands on experience.


Operations Management

OPS in ENT: Las Vegas
OPMG-GB.2313.0A (3.0 Credits)
Prof. Harry Chernoff
Trip and Pre-/Post-trip meetings (see syllabus)
See syllabus for application

When we think of entertainment, perhaps the most popular location that comes to mind is Las Vegas. Behind the glitter and excitement in Las Vegas are industries dedicated to supplying entertainment to customers. Operations addresses the supply side of business, including how products are produced and how services are supplied. This course goes behind the scenes in Las Vegas to observe and analyze the operations involved in performing this supply function. It presents an opportunity to observe and study the entertainment industry including strategy formation and decision-making that are quite unique. The underlying driver is certainly gaming, but the industries surrounding the various forms of gambling have become major profit centers separate from the millions made on the casino floors. During a one-week visit to Las Vegas, students will observe and study some of the major operating industries that comprise the broad scope of entertainment in this city.